Questions for Librarians

Did you ever have a question that you weren’t sure you should ask us? Guess what — of course you should ask! Librarians love to get questions. People ask librarians about all sorts of things. The graphic below gives an idea of what students have been asking the MVCC librarians recently. Do you have a question about research, about using the library, about something on campus? Are you wondering what kinds of pets the librarians have? Ask a Librarian!

Be Kind to Bees

It’s time to enjoy the warmer weather and all the pleasures that this time of the year provides. Flowers, fruits, and vegetables are some of of these gifts. The humble bee plays an important role in all of these products.

Bees are divided into two classes, cultivated bees (honeybees who produce honey and pollinate crops) and native bees (those who have no human interaction who also pollinate many of our plants and crops). We take bees and pollination for granted, but entomologists warn that some species of bees “who are vital for their role as pollinators are imperiled by temperature extremes, habitat loss, disease and pesticides have all contributed to the decline of many species of pollinators.” Three-fourths of the world’s flowering plants depend on pollinators to reproduce. Our food supply depends on pollinators. We can help alleviate this situation with one or two simple steps.

More information on this topic can be found in the MVCC library Science Databases

***NEW LIBRARY DATABASE*** New York Times Site Pass

The library has a new resource, the New York Times Site Pass. To access this resource, please use the URL below:

Access URL: https://go.openathens.net/redirector/morainevalley.edu?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmyaccount.nytimes.com%2Fgrouppass

1.After you authenticate (if off-campus), you will be prompted to create an individual user login.

2. When creating an individual user account, use your Moraine Valley email address.

3. After you create an individual account, you can now use that login to access the New York Times website and the New York Times App (Google Play, Apple Store) with the individual account you created.

4. Enjoy reading!!

Also note initial account creation requires the Access URL above and that this resource is limited to our students, staff, and faculty.

This resource can also be found on the database page and the news page.   If you have questions or need assistance, please ask a librarian.

Understanding Covid-19 Vaccines

This week, I was thankfully able to receive my second dose of the Pfizer vaccine for Covid-19. I am truly grateful to all of the scientists, and production and healthcare workers that made this possible. The Covid-19 vaccines that we now have available to us are nothing short of a scientific breakthrough and are a real showcase of human achievement. This amazing piece from the New York Times, How Pfizer Makes Its Covid-19 Vaccine, explains the science behind the vaccine and looks at the testing, safety, and quality controls involved in the development and production of the vaccine.

Pfizer understood from the beginning that it was science that was going to save the world from this pandemic. They gave their scientists everything they needed, no questions asked, to get the job done. In this National Geographic video, Mission Possible: The Race for a Vaccine, you can learn about the science, development, testing, security, and production involved in getting this shot into the arms of the world.

How to stop Facebook from tracking you on your iPhone

In the new iPhone update (14.5), iPhone users will have the ability to “Ask App not to Track.” This is a new feature with this update that makes your online privacy stronger. For more information, take a look at this Washington Post article: Facebook now has to ask permission to track your iPhone. Here’s how to stop it. (Note: enter “Moraine Valley” as your institution and then use your campus login to read it.)

The new iPhone update 14.5 will be pushed to phones over the next several weeks.

And the Oscar Goes to…

Last night, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (also known as “The Academy”) gave the award for Best Picture of the Year to the movie Nomadland. We don’t own the movie yet, but the library does have copies of Nomadland, the book both in print and as an e-audio book. The book and movie tell the story of a woman who lives out of her van while traveling around the American west looking for work. A few of the actresses in the movie are actual van-dwelling nomads in real life. Hopefully we will have the movie soon, but in the meantime, you can check out some of the previous Best Picture winners from the library. Click on the image below to get to a list with descriptions and available options (including the books if we own them and they share the same name as the film).

Image of theater seats and stage








Finish National Poetry Month Strong!

National Poetry Month is coming to a close, but there is still time to explore and enjoy some of the poetry resources available at the Library. Explore the virtual book displays below for poetry recommendations from the Library! For each display, click “Read More” to view the virtual book display.

Have questions about accessing any of these resources? Ask a Librarian!

What makes a poet a “Chicago Poet?” A poet born in Chicago? Someone who wrote poetry in or about Chicago? An artist embraced by the City? However you define a Chicago Poet, these artists and books are a great way to end National Poetry Month! Click “Read More” to view the full display.

Chicago Poets

Looking back on our celebrations of Black History Month and Women’s History Month, “Distilled and Powerful,” display of poetry by African American women, brings our poetry celebration full circle! Click “Read More” to view the full display.

Distilled and Powerful

Keep National Poetry Month going all summer! Poetry is meant to be heard, so listen to these fantastic poetry e-audiobooks, many of which are read by the authors! Click “Read More” to view the full display.

Listen to Poetry

Virtual Coffeehouse & Poetry Event (video)

We celebrate National Poetry Month by featuring student poets. We also have student musical guests. As part of this event, we announce the winners of the student poetry contest that was organized by the Glacier and the Library.

How might psychology help us understand the rise of extremism and belief in conspiracy theories?

Join psychology professors Mitchell Baker, Dr. Laura Lauzen-Collins, and Nick Shizas as they explore psychology concepts that help us better understand the rise of extremism and belief in conspiracy theories.

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