Technology

Biometrics: Automated Unobtrusive Measures

Bush et al. (2020) described qualitative researchers as primary instruments who investigate real-life events or problems. In addition, reflexivity is defined as the possibility of the occurrence of researcher bias at any time during a study. It is suggested that researchers incorporate methods to address researcher bias and remain neutral, as well as objective throughout the investigation to ensure the quality and credibility of the study. For example, direct observation requires informed consent for all voluntary participants. In addition, the investigator should inform the participants of their right to opt out of the study at any time.

In contrast, Connelly (2017) described unobtrusive measures as indirect observations that take place in real-life situations without the permission of the individuals who are under surveillance (possibly violating individual rights to privacy). Further, unobtrusive measures permit investigators to gather data while individuals are unaware and nonreactive. The use of unobtrusive measures combined with technology is becoming more prevalent in various aspects of everyday life in the form of biometrics.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, law enforcement, the National Institute of Standards and Technology discuss how biometrics has evolved. Biometrics is also used in e-commerce and airports. However, there are risks involved with using biometrics.


References

Bloomberg. (2014, October 31). Killing the need for passwords with biometrics. https://youtu.be/88Rjg8gM_DI

Bush, A. A., Amechi, M., & Persky, A. (2020). Qualitative research in pharmacy education: An exploration of pharmacy education researchers’ perceptions and experiences conducting qualitative research. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 84(3), 334–344.
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspxdirect=true&AuthType=ip,sso&db=a9h&AN=142856738&site=ehost-live&custid=s8876422

Connelly, L. M. (2017). Understanding research. Unobtrusive Measures. MEDSURG Nursing, 26(1), 59–61. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspxdirect=true&AuthType=ip,sso&db=a9h&AN=121353517&site=ehost-live&custid=s8876422

Financial Times. (2016, November 4). Banking biometrics: Hacking risk: Personal finance. https://youtu.be/MgWNmWRBaVk

Homeland Security. (2019). Biometrics. United States Department of Homeland Security. https://www.dhs.gov/biometrics

National Institute of Standards and Technology. (2010, March 2). Key to security: Biometric Standards. https://youtu.be/I2LCofq-Bts

Wall Street Journal. (2019, August 15). How facial recognition will get you to your gate faster.
https://youtu.be/RAHzT68l6tM

Washington Post. (2019, April 30). Police are using Amazon’s facial recognition technology: Privacy experts are worried. https://youtu.be/tUFmXfKeSGM

Happy Birthday Raspberry Pi!

Eight years ago a credit card-sized, affordable computer landed on the market, making computing and programming accessible to a wide audience. Since then, the Raspberry Pi has been a hit with scientists, hobbyists, students, and kids alike.

Take a look at these fun projects for beginners to get some inspiration!

The Library has several books and eBooks about the Raspberry Pi to get you started on your project. We also have resources on coding in Python and Scratch.

Have you been participating in this year’s One Book One College program? Use your Raspberry Pi to experiment with machine learning!

Pi day is coming up on March 14th (3-14!). Here’s how one academic library celebrated using the Raspberry Pi.

Katherine Johnson 1918 – 2020

Today marks the passing of one of the great minds of mathematics. Katherine Johnson, a mathematician at NASA during the Space Race, contributed to projects such as America’s first human space flight, the first moon landing, and the Space Shuttle.

In 2015 she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest honor given to civilians, for her 33 years of work with NASA.

She was best known for the calculations that helped put John Glenn in orbit around the Earth, the story behind Hidden Figures, available at the library in DVD, book, eBook, and eAudio format.

International Day of Women and Girls in Science

The United Nations has designated February 11th as International Day of Women and Girls in Science, a day that highlights how important it is to encourage a new generation of women to enter into the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) fields. International Day of Women and Girls in Science aims to break down harmful stereotypes and narratives as well as promote policies that makes STEM fields more accessible to women and girls.

How Can You Celebrate Women in Science?

Introduce Girls and Young Women to STEM Careers

  • Moraine Valley supports women entering technology fields with its Women in Technology Mentoring program.
  • Know a girl entering eighth grade? She might want to sign up for Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day on February 20th at Argonne National Laboratory.
  • Girls aged 10-18 can get involved with Girls 4 Science, a non-profit dedicated to getting young women in Chicago involved in the STEM fields.

Daylight saving time is ending- what will you be doing?

Pocket Watch - 3D render
“Pocket Watch – 3D render” by Áron Jakab is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Have you thought about what you want to do with your extra hour this Sunday? Sure, you could catch up on sleep, but there are so many options to consider!

Why don’t you ~fall back~ into the couch and enjoy an hour long episode of the PBS series How We Got to Now on time.

Perhaps you’d prefer to enjoy the soothing vocals of Seal’s “Daylight Saving” from his 2015 (and conveniently 50-minute-long) album, 7.

Maybe you find yourself contemplating the very nature of time? Why not explore those questions by reading Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History of Time.

Need help with time management? Learn how to balance your time between your work life and social life while still prioritizing your personal time.

Now stop wasting time and make the most of your additional hour!

Time to Retire the Stethoscope?

The stethoscope has been an iconic symbol of medicine for over two hundred years. But it looks like this device will be replaced by “ultra sound scanners and digital stethoscopes that can be paired with smartphones to create moving pictures and readouts”.

The Butterfly iQ device “includes artificial intelligence to help users position the probe and interpret the images.”

Some physicians are concerned with the price of the new tool, but others in the medical field feel that the accurate readings are well worth the price.

Watch a brief TEDMED video on the use of AI in the medical field.

Artificial Intelligence & Machine Learning: Realities & Possibilities (video)

There’s a great deal of hype around intelligent systems that identify patterns in data and make decisions. This faculty panel discussion seeks cut through the hype with the goal of helping us understand the current state of machine learning and how this technology will shape the future.This event is part of our One Book program on I, Robot by Isaac Asimov.

How AI is Changing the Healthcare Landscape and What’s Coming Next

Machine learning and high-powered data processing has the potential to transform medicine and healthcare. How will you make healthcare decisions in the future? How will treatments evolve thanks to data? In this talk, A.I. expert David Ducat will talk about the actual work in healthcare-related, machine learning based on what he is seeing in the field. This event is part of our One Book program on I, Robot by Isaac Asimov.

New Library of Congress Website for “Constitution Annotated”

September 17th is Constitution Day, a day commemorating the signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787. In conjunction with this, the Library of Congress has launched a new website “mak[ing] the 3,000 pages of the Constitution Annotated fully searchable and accessible for the first time to online audiences – including Congress, legal scholars, law students and anyone interested in U.S. constitutional law.” (New Website Makes the U.S. Constitution Searchable with Supreme Court Interpretations Throughout History: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-19-090?loclr=ealn)

So what is the Constitution Annotated you ask? “… known officially as the Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation–[it] has served as the official record of the U.S. Constitution. Prepared by attorneys in the American Law Division of the Library’s Congressional Research Service, it explains in layman’s terms the Constitution’s origins, how it was crafted and how every provision in the Constitution has been interpreted throughout history.”

Starting at the Home page, click on “Browse” in the top right-hand corner.
You’re taken to this page where you can browse the Preamble, Articles, & Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.
Then, if you click on “Nineteenth Amendment” for example, you’ll be taken to this page. To see the explanation in “layman’s terms” you would click on the highlighted portion above: “Amdt19.S1.1  Women’s Suffrage”
Which results in this page, the page prepared by attorneys in the American Law Division of the Library’s Congressional Research Service, complete with footnotes at the bottom.

So, check out the new website, Constitution Annotated: Analysis and Interpretation of the U.S. Constitution https://constitution.congress.gov/. Could be easier than carrying the pocket Constitution!

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