Information Literacy

How Misinformation can impact political processes, policymaking and election laws (Video)

This event examines the role that disinformation can play in impacting election laws and policymaking. Political Science Professor and Democracy Commitment Coordinator Kevin Navratil will explore how misinformation has influenced recent voting laws, decisions to declare land a national heritage site, anti-GMO labeling, and chemical safety laws.  

Blame it on the media: The erosion of trust and truth, and what we can do about it (video)

We love to blame “the media” for all of society’s ills. It’s true that trends in the news media have contributed to where we are today: divided, uncivil, unable to agree on the most basic facts. But trust in the media was declining long before claims of “fake news” and labeling the press as “the enemy of the people.” In the second part of this conversation, Communications and Journalism professor Lisa Couch and Information Lite racy Librarian Tish Hayes focus on practical ways to improve our own “fake news” filters and recognize truth amidst overwhelming amounts of misinformation. They will also consider how we might work toward solutions to the erosion of trust and truth—the very foundation of our democracy. This event is organized by the MVCC Democracy Commitment.

Getting sucked down the rabbit hole: Tribes, filter bubbles, identity fusion, and conspiracy theories

Faculty member, Dr. Laura Lauzen-Collins , discusses conspiracy theories and misinformation. Why do so many well-meaning, intelligent people get sucked down the rabbit hole of conspiracy theories? The answer lies our mind’s own predispositions and shortcuts to forming our identity and sense of reality and the social media landscape that takes advantage of them. In this talk, we will focus on those predispositions and shortcuts that make us vulnerable to getting sucked down the rabbit hole.  This event is organized by the Library & the Democracy Commitment.

How to stop Facebook from tracking you on your iPhone

In the new iPhone update (14.5), iPhone users will have the ability to “Ask App not to Track.” This is a new feature with this update that makes your online privacy stronger. For more information, take a look at this Washington Post article: Facebook now has to ask permission to track your iPhone. Here’s how to stop it. (Note: enter “Moraine Valley” as your institution and then use your campus login to read it.)

The new iPhone update 14.5 will be pushed to phones over the next several weeks.

How might psychology help us understand the rise of extremism and belief in conspiracy theories?

Join psychology professors Mitchell Baker, Dr. Laura Lauzen-Collins, and Nick Shizas as they explore psychology concepts that help us better understand the rise of extremism and belief in conspiracy theories.

Blame it on the media: The erosion of trust and truth, and what we can do about it (Video)

We love to blame “the media” for all of society’s ills. It’s true that trends in the news media have contributed to where we are today: divided, uncivil, unable to agree on the most basic facts. But trust in the media was declining long before claims of “fake news” and labeling the press as “the enemy of the people.” So how can we recognize truth and identify lies? How can we improve our own “fake news” filters? How can we work toward solutions to the erosion of trust and truth—the very foundation of our democracy? Please join Communications and Journalism professor Lisa Couch and Information Literacy Librarian Tish Hayes in this timely and important discussion. This event is organized by the MVCC Democracy Commitment.

Our Shared Shelf 3: Learning, Immigration, Writing, Girls in School

Librarians Sharon and Hannah recommend items from the MVCC Library collections! In this episode we talk about: 
1) The New Science of Learning by Terry Doyle and Todd Zakrajsek.
2) Illegal by Jose Angel N
3) They Say, I Say by Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein, and Russel Durst
4) How Girls Achieve by Sally A. Nuamah

Outbreak Support: Student & Faculty Services Pages

As classes have moved from face-to-face to online, our librarians have been working to put together resources for students and faculty. Please visit this pages:

Library online services remain open! 

  • Librarians are answering questions via chat, email and text during hours of operation
  • Librarians are ready to work with students in online courses! 
  • The online library is open 24/7 with 1000s of ebooks, articles, and online video. 
  • The Library’s social media accounts will be sharing resources. Follow us on Facebook, TwitterInstagram, and YouTube

National News Literacy Week

With so much talk about “fake news”, how do you know what’s real and what’s fake? The best way is to polish up your critical thinking muscles and learn some news literacy skills!

January 27th – 31st is National News Literacy Week, a joint effort from the News Literacy Project (NLP) and the E.W. Scripps Company. The goal is to increase awareness of news literacy as a life skill and to promote the importance of a free press in a democratic society.

How can you tell if you’re news-literate? Take the quiz or Get Smart About the News with some of NLP’s other resources.

Want to get better at spotting fake news and bad information? Learn a new media skill: lateral reading. Watch the video to learn more:

Librarians are always ready to help you figure out fact from fiction. Stop in at the library, call, text, or chat with us to get help!

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