In the Headlines

Blog posts about big news stories and issues (i.e. not local news)

Fill It Up!

The United States is no stranger to fuel crises. The most recent disaster centered on the Colonial Pipeline, which is located in the southeastern part of the country. “It is the largest pipeline system for refined oil products in the U.S. The pipeline is 5,500 miles long and can carry 3 million barrels of fuel per day between Texas and New York.” The company stopped transporting oil after its system was hacked (May 7) by a ransomware attack. This pipeline supplies 45 percent of the fuel used on the East Coast. The vulnerability of fuel lines, government installations, companies, hospitals, etc. has many cyber security experts concerned. The gas line has resumed service after the company paid $5 million to the hackers.

The 1970s experienced two major gasoline shortages. Conflict in the Middle East caused a gas shortage in 1973. OPEC initiated an oil embargo in response to the United States siding with Israel during the Yom Kippur War. “At the time, OPEC accounted for an average of two-thirds of American oil imports in the 70s. ” Long lines, limited hours, and increased costs were just some of the problems that consumers faced. The second fuel shortage took place in 1979. The Shah of Iran was deposed and replaced by the Ayatollah Khomeini who used Iran’s oil as a tool to restrain the economy of the West.

Hopefully, future fuel sources will not depend on any specific countries or leaders to move cars or planes. Hybrid and electric cars are becoming more the norm but they still have issues that must be addressed. Researchers are studying hydrogen, which is another potential source of fuel. Conceivably, scientists will be able to discover a cheaper and cleaner source of energy.

The Science Behind Why We Wear Masks

Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2

Do you remember at the beginning of the pandemic when many were saying that masks don’t protect against Covid-19? At the time, based on a long standing myth in the physics, it was thought that the virus could not be airborne because the particles were too large to remain aerosol. Last summer, a group of scientists challenged that thought which finally lead the World Health Organization and CDC to acknowledge that SARS-CoV-2 is, in fact, airborne. You can read about the origin of the myth and the research that lead to uncovering it in Wired magazine’s article, The 60-Year-Old Scientific Screwup that Helped Covid Kill. You can also read about it in this British Medical Journal editorial, Covid-19 Has Redefined Airborne Transmission or this government document Dismantling Myths on the Airborne Transmission of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). If you would like to do more research on SARS-CoV-2 or any other scientific topic, you can try one of the Moraine Valley Library’s science databases or our nursing and biological science databases. For help with this or any other research inquiries, the librarians are always happy to help. Just Ask a Librarian.

How to stop Facebook from tracking you on your iPhone

In the new iPhone update (14.5), iPhone users will have the ability to “Ask App not to Track.” This is a new feature with this update that makes your online privacy stronger. For more information, take a look at this Washington Post article: Facebook now has to ask permission to track your iPhone. Here’s how to stop it. (Note: enter “Moraine Valley” as your institution and then use your campus login to read it.)

The new iPhone update 14.5 will be pushed to phones over the next several weeks.

And the Oscar Goes to…

Last night, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (also known as “The Academy”) gave the award for Best Picture of the Year to the movie Nomadland. We don’t own the movie yet, but the library does have copies of Nomadland, the book both in print and as an e-audio book. The book and movie tell the story of a woman who lives out of her van while traveling around the American west looking for work. A few of the actresses in the movie are actual van-dwelling nomads in real life. Hopefully we will have the movie soon, but in the meantime, you can check out some of the previous Best Picture winners from the library. Click on the image below to get to a list with descriptions and available options (including the books if we own them and they share the same name as the film).

Image of theater seats and stage








Women’s History Month 2021

Started in 1978, Women’s History Month observes the contributions of women to culture, history and humankind. President Jimmy Carter first declared the week of March 8 as National Women’s History Week in 1980. The following year, U.S. Congress passed a resolution that made the week a national celebration. In 1987, The National Women’s History Project successfully petitioned Congress to expand the celebration to the entire month of March.

To celebrate check out these free virtual programs being offered by Illinois institutions to recognize some important contributions of women to the world. Registration is required. Click on the title of the program for registration information.

Saturday, March 20, 2021 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm

High Tea at Hall: The Women of Hall Branch — Archivist Beverly Cook will discuss the librarians and patrons of the past from the Chicago Public Library Hall Branch in Bronzeville; including Vivian Harsh (branch manager), Charlemae Hill Rollins (children’s librarian), and Gwendolyn Brooks (patron). 

March 25th, 2021 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Title IX – The Landmark Legislation that Transformed American Sports — Join Jackie Joyner-Kersee, the co-authors of the definitive book on Title IX and others to discuss the impact of the 1972 legislation that vastly expanded opportunities for women in sports at the high school and college levels. Brought to you by the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

March 25, 2021 6:30 pm to 7:30 pm

Virtual Artist Talk: Miranda July on Mail Art — Filmmaker, artist, and author Miranda July and others join for a conversation exploring the history and practice of mail art, a form of art that has re-established itself in this era of social distancing. Hosted by the Art Institute of Chicago.

Source information: https://www.history.com/topics/holidays/womens-history-month, Image credit: https://alltogether.swe.org/2021/02/celebrating-womens-history-month/

What does “vaccine efficacy” mean?

With the third Covid-19 vaccine approved by the FDA, there has been a great of talk comparing “vaccine efficacy” rates. You may be trying to figure out what all of this means? What is “vaccine efficacy” and can we use it to compare the different vaccines? Well, this NY Times article “What Do Vaccine Efficacy Numbers Actually Mean?”really helps. Ihttps://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/03/03/science/vaccine-efficacy-coronavirus.html?smid=url-sharet offers some clear explanations.

Chinese New Year 2021

Happy Lunar New Year! The Chinese New Year falls on February 12, 2021 and the celebration lasts for several weeks. “The Chinese Zodiac, a system that has existed in Chinese culture for more than 2,000 years, dictates which animal represents a given year.” The cycle repeats every 12 years, and 2021 is the Year of the Ox.”

The Moraine Valley Library extends a Happy New Year to our International Students from China.

Screen time and the brain

“Headaches, anxiety and exhaustion caused by screen time that never ends is not just for adults anymore.”

A CNN study showed 80 percent of teenagers check their phones on the hour, and 72 percent need to respond to their messages right away. Teens also preferred texting rather than speaking and often used a device to “save and protect” them from social interactions. Harvard research in 2019 revealed that too much screen time can “interfere with sleep and creativity.” It is not only teenagers–have you felt compelled to leave your phone at home or feel a sense of terror, or relief, when you did? Do you purposefully move your phone across the room or turn it off to get away? Are you exhausted, easily distracted and constantly multi-tasking online and in “real life”?

Take a break says Dr. Michael Rich who also suggests:

Put down your device. Be present with others. Observe the world around you. Let your mind wander. Avoid blue light-emitting screen use before bedtime.

Find sources and additional readings on this topic below:

Screen Time and the Brain

Shirolkar, Shivani. “Screened in: Cell Phones Dictate our Lives.” University Wire, 22 Mar 2017. SIRS Issues Researcherhttps://go.openathens.net/redirector/morainevalley.edu?url=https://explore.proquest.com/sirsissuesresearcher/document/2265372339?accountid=1977.

US teens use screens more than seven hours a day on average – and that’s not including school work

Kelly, Heather. “With Remote Learning, it’s Now Screen Time all the Time.” Washington Post, 06 Sep 2020. SIRS Issues Researcherhttps://go.openathens.net/redirector/morainevalley.edu?url=https://explore.proquest.com/sirsissuesresearcher/document/2453819623?accountid=1977.

Photo: “Screen Time” by A.Davey is licensed with CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/

Best Books of 2020

Looking for something to read over Winter break? Check out the titles considered some of the best of 2020 by the New York Public Library and the Chicago Public Library. Click on the title or link below for a book summary. If you are new to Hoopla–create an account using your MVCC email, select Moraine Valley Community College as your library and use your MVCC username in place of a library card number. For help with Hoopla click here or Ask a Librarian. For Library Winter break hours click here.

The Aosawa Murders by Riku Onda (e-book)

The Bear by Andrew Krivak (e-book)

Children of the Land by Marcelo Hernandez Castillo (book)

Everywhere You Don’t Belong: A Novel by Gabriel Bump (e-book)

Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot by Mikki Kendall (e-book)

Hurricane Season: A Novel by Fernanda Melchor, translated by Sophie Hughes

https://encore.morainevalley.edu/iii/encore/record/C__Rb430510 (e-book)

Interior Chinatown: A Novel by Charles Yu (book)

Little Gods: A Novel by Meng Jin (book)

Long Bright River: A Novel by Liz Moore (book)

Overground Railroad: The Green Book and the Roots of Black Travel in America

by Candacy A. Taylor

https://encore.morainevalley.edu/iii/encore/record/C__Rb672595 (e-pub full-text)
https://encore.morainevalley.edu/iii/encore/record/C__Rb708526 (e-book Hoopla)

Such a Fun Age: A Novel by Kiley Reid (book)

Supreme Inequality: The Supreme Court’s Fifty-year Battle for a More Unjust America by Adam Cohen (book)

Temporary: A Novel by Hilary Leichter (e-book)

Upright Women Wanted by Sarah Gailey (e-audiobook)

Writers & Lovers: A Novel by Lily King (e-book)

Chicago Public Library Best of the Best 2020

New York Public Library Best Books of 2020

WP2Social Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com