Daylight saving time is ending- what will you be doing?

Pocket Watch - 3D render
“Pocket Watch – 3D render” by Áron Jakab is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Have you thought about what you want to do with your extra hour this Sunday? Sure, you could catch up on sleep, but there are so many options to consider!

Why don’t you ~fall back~ into the couch and enjoy an hour long episode of the PBS series How We Got to Now on time.

Perhaps you’d prefer to enjoy the soothing vocals of Seal’s “Daylight Saving” from his 2015 (and conveniently 50-minute-long) album, 7.

Maybe you find yourself contemplating the very nature of time? Why not explore those questions by reading Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History of Time.

Need help with time management? Learn how to balance your time between your work life and social life while still prioritizing your personal time.

Now stop wasting time and make the most of your additional hour!

The 1919 Chicago Race Riot: A talk by Dr. Eric Allen Hall

In the summer of 1919, the South Side of Chicago erupted in racial violence following the death of Eugene Williams, an African-American youth who had mistakenly drifted into the “white” section of Lake Michigan’s 29th Street Beach. By the time the fires were extinguished a week later, thirty-eight people had been killed and thousands more had seen their homes destroyed. It would be the worst of over twenty race riots that plagued the United States during what came to be known as “Red Summer.” Dr. Eric Allen hall Associate Professor of History at Norther Illinois University will examine the causes, events, and legacy of the 1919 Chicago Race Riot through the experiences of those who witnessed the violence.

The Grand Canyon: Home to Ancient Vampire Bats and Ground Sloth Poop

A long time ago in a canyon far far away… prehistoric animals left traces of their existence for scientists to discover. We celebrate those discoveries and their contributions to science with National Fossil Day. This year’s focus is the rich knowledge gained from the fossils found at the Grand Canyon National Park

This year’s promotional artwork depicts a 9 foot long Shasta Ground Sloth entering Rampart Cave on the west end of the park, surrounded by the large droppings that remained fossilized in the cave for around 11,000- 40,000 years. The fossilized dung has provided a wealth of information about the local plants and environmental conditions from the sloth’s time.

Also included in the artwork is an extinct vampire bat, a distant but larger cousin to living vampire bats in Central and South America. Remains found in the cave suggests these bats may have fed on the blood of the Shasta Ground Sloth. Prehistoric life could be pretty rough!

The Grand Canyon might seem far from Moraine Valley, but you’re closer to fossils than you might think. Mazon Creek is a well-known fossil collecting site in Illinois, famous for its excellent preservation and fossil variety.

One of the more interesting findings to come out of Mazon Creek is now the Illinois state fossil. Known as the Tully Monster (Tullimonstrum gregarium), scientists currently believe it was a soft-bodied invertebrate that lived on the sea floor back when Illinois used to sit near the equator. Its strange body shape has left scientists stumped as to what kind of animal it actually was.

The library has plenty of books and media to satisfy your need for fossil knowledge. Find them here!

Celebrate the Glacier

Moraine Valley’s Student Newspaper, the Glacier, has been published for 51 years. Experience the past through the eyes of the front pages with “A Visual History of the Moraine Valley Student Newspaper” display.

The display is located on a bulletin board across from the Art Gallery in the U Building. It will be up through October.

1968 Front Page

New Library of Congress Website for “Constitution Annotated”

September 17th is Constitution Day, a day commemorating the signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787. In conjunction with this, the Library of Congress has launched a new website “mak[ing] the 3,000 pages of the Constitution Annotated fully searchable and accessible for the first time to online audiences – including Congress, legal scholars, law students and anyone interested in U.S. constitutional law.” (New Website Makes the U.S. Constitution Searchable with Supreme Court Interpretations Throughout History: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-19-090?loclr=ealn)

So what is the Constitution Annotated you ask? “… known officially as the Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation–[it] has served as the official record of the U.S. Constitution. Prepared by attorneys in the American Law Division of the Library’s Congressional Research Service, it explains in layman’s terms the Constitution’s origins, how it was crafted and how every provision in the Constitution has been interpreted throughout history.”

Starting at the Home page, click on “Browse” in the top right-hand corner.
You’re taken to this page where you can browse the Preamble, Articles, & Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.
Then, if you click on “Nineteenth Amendment” for example, you’ll be taken to this page. To see the explanation in “layman’s terms” you would click on the highlighted portion above: “Amdt19.S1.1  Women’s Suffrage”
Which results in this page, the page prepared by attorneys in the American Law Division of the Library’s Congressional Research Service, complete with footnotes at the bottom.

So, check out the new website, Constitution Annotated: Analysis and Interpretation of the U.S. Constitution https://constitution.congress.gov/. Could be easier than carrying the pocket Constitution!

Pioneers: First Women Filmmakers

A new addition to the MVCC catalog is a six-disc collection that features silent films directed/written by women. This DVD collection Pioneers: First Women Filmmakers honors “the women who were instrumental in shaping the very core of cinema as we know it.”

You may to want to view our catalog to see what else the MVCC library has on this subject. Also, don’t forget to view the MVCC databases and read newspaper articles about silent era movies and early Hollywood directors and stars from the Chicago Tribune Historical Newspaper and the New York Times Historical Newspaper.

101 Free Silent Films

Information on Silent Films

Millennials and Silent Movies

50th Anniversary of Woodstock

This August will be the 50th anniversary of Woodstock, a rock concert that some historians believe “defined an entire generation and its effects on music and American culture can still be felt today.”

Check out the Chicago Tribune Historical newspaper and the New York Times Historical newspaper to get a 1969 perspective of the concert.

Happy Juneteenth!

“The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.”

June 19, 1865 — the day that word of slavery’s end reached Texas, more than two years after the Emancipation Proclamation — is now celebrated today as Juneteenth, America’s second independence day. (read more from the Smithsonaian Magazine, “Juneteenth: Our Other Independence Day.”

Check out this talk about Juneteenth by faculty member Amani Wazwaz:

Flag Day – June 14, 2019

Celebrate Flag Day by checking out some of our resources! We have:

  • Flags of Our Fathers by James Bradley with Ron Powers: eBook Clint Eastwood film based on book “In February 1945, American Marines plunged into the surf at Iwo Jima–and into history. Through a hail of machine-gun and mortar fire that left the beaches strewn with comrades, they battled to the island’s highest peak. And after climbing through a landscape of hell itself, they raised a flag. Now the son of one of the flagraisers has written a powerful account of six very different young men who came together in a moment that will live forever. To his family, John Bradley never spoke of the photograph or the war. But after his death at age seventy, his family discovered closed boxes of letters and photos. In Flags of Our Fathers, James Bradley draws on those documents to retrace the lives of his father and the men of Easy Company. Following these men’s paths to Iwo Jima, James Bradley has written a classic story of the heroic battle for the Pacific’s most crucial island–an island riddled with Japanese tunnels and 22,000 fanatic defenders who would fight to the last man. But perhaps the most interesting part of the story is what happened after the victory. The men in the photo–three were killed during the battle–were proclaimed heroes and flown home, to become reluctant symbols. For two of them, the adulation was shattering. Only James Bradley’s father truly survived, displaying no copy of the famous photograph in his home, telling his son only: ‘The real heroes of Iwo Jima were the guys who didn’t come back.’ Few books ever have captured the complexity and furor of war and its aftermath as well as Flags of Our Fathers. A penetrating, epic look at a generation at war, this is history told with keen insight, enormous honesty, and the passion of a son paying homage to his father. It is the story of the difference between truth and myth, the meaning of being a hero, and the essence of the human experience of war.”–Publisher description.
  • A Flag Worth Dying For: The Power and Politics of National Symbols by Tim Marshall: “A nation’s flag fluttering in the wind is a sign of power, hope, history, and often war. However, we rarely stop to consider the complex meaning and strong sentiments flags evoke and embody today. From the renewed nationalism of China, to political conflicts in Europe and America, to the terrifying rise of ISIS, the world is a confusing place place right now, and we need to understand the symbols, old and new, that people are rallying around and fighting over. Forthousands of years flags have stood for our identities and ideals. We wave them, burn them, and march under their colors. And still, in the twenty-first century, we die for them. Flags fly at the UN, on the Arab street, from front porches in Texas. They represent the politics of high power as well as the passions of the mob. In ‘A Flag Worth Dying For,’ Tim Marshall–author of the New York Times bestseller ‘Prisoners of Geography: Ten Maps That Explain Everything About the World’, called ‘quite simply, one of the best books about geopoliticies you could imagine’ (London Evening Standard)–returns to the arena of global affairs, combining keen analysis of current events with world history to reveal the power and politics of the symbols that both unite and divide us. In nine chapters covering America, the United Kingdom, Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Latin America, international banners, and flags of terror, Marshall offers insights into the flags of more than eighty-five countries, among them key global superpowers as well as dozens of smaller nations, and shows how their hidden histories figure in the diplomatic relations and political movements of today’s urgent headlines.”–Book jacket

We also have some nice resources for kids in our Juvenile Collection:

  • Exploring our nation. American symbols of freedom – DVD “What’s the story behind some of America’s symbols of liberty? Some of the icons discussed include: the American Flag, the Pledge of Allegiance, the Great Seal of the United States, and the origins of ‘The Star Spangled Banner.’ Students also learn the story of the Statue of Liberty and the importance of Independence Hall in Philadelphia in establishing the country. A new symbol of American freedom is Freedom Tower in New York which was built after the Twin Towers were attacked on September 11, 2001. Part of the series Exploring Our Nation.”–Publisher description
  • Why are there stripes on the American flag? by Martha E. H. Rustad – eBook “Children learn about the American flag, discussing the history of the flag, what the stars, stripes, and colors represent and what the pledge of allegiance means.”–eReadIllinois.
  • We love our flag by Jean Feldman and Holly Karapetkova – eBook “Introduces the American flag and what it stands for through a song sung to the tune of ‘The Farmer in the Dell.'”–eReadIllinois.

June Is Audiobook Appreciation Month

If you have never tried an audiobook format, June is the perfect month. Besides the fact that June is “Audiobook Appreciation Month,” it is also the start of summer vacations. If you are looking for something to listen to while traveling, try out an audiobook. If a hardcover format of a book is on a L-O-N-G library holds list, try out the audiobook version.

During the month of June, we will highlight some audiobook choices that may be of interest to you. This week, it is Hamilton: The Revolution, read by Mariska Hargitay, Lin-Manuel Miranda, & Jeremy McCarter.

This audiobook “gives listeners an unprecedented view of both revolutions, from the only two writers able to provide it. Miranda, along with Jeremy McCarter… traces [the show’s] development from an improbable performance at the White House to its landmark opening night on Broadway six years later.”

Container

Hamilton closes here in Chicago on January 5th, 2020, so if you have gone to see it, or are going before the close, check out this audiobook about the famous musical play.