History

Examining the relationship between pandemics, extremism, mistrust, and the rejection of authorities

Join history professors Merri Fefles-Dunkle, Josh Fulton, and Jim McIntrye as they explore the role of the state throughout history to help us understand the connection between pandemics and the rise in extremism, mistrust, and rejection of authorities. This event is organized by the MVCC Democracy Commitment.

Women’s History Month 2021

Started in 1978, Women’s History Month observes the contributions of women to culture, history and humankind. President Jimmy Carter first declared the week of March 8 as National Women’s History Week in 1980. The following year, U.S. Congress passed a resolution that made the week a national celebration. In 1987, The National Women’s History Project successfully petitioned Congress to expand the celebration to the entire month of March.

To celebrate check out these free virtual programs being offered by Illinois institutions to recognize some important contributions of women to the world. Registration is required. Click on the title of the program for registration information.

Saturday, March 20, 2021 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm

High Tea at Hall: The Women of Hall Branch — Archivist Beverly Cook will discuss the librarians and patrons of the past from the Chicago Public Library Hall Branch in Bronzeville; including Vivian Harsh (branch manager), Charlemae Hill Rollins (children’s librarian), and Gwendolyn Brooks (patron). 

March 25th, 2021 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Title IX – The Landmark Legislation that Transformed American Sports — Join Jackie Joyner-Kersee, the co-authors of the definitive book on Title IX and others to discuss the impact of the 1972 legislation that vastly expanded opportunities for women in sports at the high school and college levels. Brought to you by the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

March 25, 2021 6:30 pm to 7:30 pm

Virtual Artist Talk: Miranda July on Mail Art — Filmmaker, artist, and author Miranda July and others join for a conversation exploring the history and practice of mail art, a form of art that has re-established itself in this era of social distancing. Hosted by the Art Institute of Chicago.

Source information: https://www.history.com/topics/holidays/womens-history-month, Image credit: https://alltogether.swe.org/2021/02/celebrating-womens-history-month/

Revisiting the Past & Looking to the Future: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion 1919-2021-Dr. Tracy Crump (video)

Special guest Dr. Tracy Crump, Associate Professor of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice at St. Xavier University. Dr. Crump’s talk will consider how to build inclusive spaces in our society by exploring the root causes of social unrest in Chicago over the last century. She will start with the Red Summer of 1919 and move forward.

Tracy Crump holds the Ph.D. in Criminology, Law and Justice from the University of Illinois at Chicago, a juris doctorate from from the John Marshall Law School, and earned the LL.M. (post-JD studies) at Loyola University Chicago School of Law.

Was it really a year like no other? 2020 in Historical Context (video)

The year 2020 was a year to remember, but how unique was it? How does it compare to other historic moments? MVCC history faculty consider these questions. This event is part of the Moraine Valley One Book, One College program.

Are Confederate Monuments History? Assessing the Lost Cause, Monuments, & Race (video)

In recent years, a vigorous debate has occurred online and in the streets over the meaning of monuments to the Confederacy and its leaders during the American Civil War. In this presentation, Associate Professor of History Josh Fulton explores the Lost Cause movement and its efforts to reshape historical memory of the Confederacy and the Civil War through monuments and more.
This event is part of our One Book, One College program.

The Collars of RBG

With the passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg this past fall, we lost an icon and a trailblazer. She stood out on the Supreme Court for her dedication and her ideals. She also stood out for the beautiful collars that she added to her justice robes. Since the robes were designed to show the shirt collar and tie worn by men, she added a feminine touch. The collars were also often worn as a statement, such as her famous dissent collar. Over the years, she amassed a stunning collection.

Recently, TIME magazine was given access to the collection to showcase and tell the stories of the various pieces. View the article here. To learn more about the life and legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, try these books and videos from the MVCC library.

The Electoral College: How does it work and should it be updated?(video)

Political Science professor Kevin Navratil will discuss why the Electoral College was created, the process of electing the president, and benefits and drawbacks of this electoral system versus electing the president by a nationwide popular vote. This event is organized by the MVCC Democracy Commitment.

Debunking Electoral College Myths

In most U.S. elections, the winner of the popular vote is the winner of the election. As we have seen many times, that is not always the case in the presidential election due to our Electoral College system. In particular, the winner-take-all laws in many states have resulted in the winner of the popular vote losing the election. This has led to millions of votes being effectively ignored and swing states, and swing state issues, carrying more weight than others.

Many people, for many years, have felt that the Electoral College system is unfair. It is a system that came about because of slavery and the result is that some votes count more than others. Since 1797, there have been roughly 800 attempts in Congress to get rid of the system. These have come from states both large and small and from both sides of the aisle. Defenders of the Electoral College point to reasons like: It protects small states. It’s what The Founders wanted. The way it works is written into the Constitution. Democrats will always win without it.

These are all myths. There is a way to fix it. Watch this short, informative video from The New York Times to find out more. To delve even deeper into the topic, these books from the MVCC Library are a great next step.

History, Epidemics, and How Governments Respond (video)

With concern over the Covid-19 Pandemic dominating all aspects of society, join political science and history faculty members Kevin Navratil, Jim McIntyre and Josh Fulton for a discussion of how the United States has grappled with disease outbreaks in the past. From Yellow Fever to Spanish Flu, come understand how Americans coped and how governments sought to combat the threats of disease.

The 19th Anniversary of 9/11

Today marks the anniversary of the terrorist assault on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and Flight 93. The attacks claimed the lives of 2,977 people.

The MVCC library has an extensive collection of material that may help you understand the initial attack and the tragedy that continues to have long lasting effects on America and the world. You may find this article interesting. The author explores how different generations view the 9/11 tragedy.

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