History

Columbus Day or Indigenous Peoples’ Day?

If you have children, chances are they have no school tomorrow (October 11th) due to Columbus Day. If they go to Chicago Public Schools, it’s due to Indigenous Peoples’ Day. (Moraine Valley is NOT closed tomorrow.) So which is it, Columbus Day or Indigenous Peoples’ Day? According to an NBC5 article entitled What to Know about Indigenous Peoples’ Day and Columbus Day in Illinois, in 2017, Illinois designated the last Monday of September as Indigenous Peoples’ Day. However on Friday, President Biden made a proclamation that October 11th will officially be known as Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

If you are interested in learning more about Indigenous Peoples’, the Moraine Valley Library has you covered. We have many books and videos about Indigenous Peoples’. We have many databases that might be useful for finding articles or videos about Indigenous Peoples. Here are the search results from our Academic Search Complete database on Indigenous Peoples of the Americas.

When in doubt, the librarians are always happy to help. Just be sure to Ask a Librarian.

Photo credits: “National Indigenous People’s Day Celebration” by danna § curious tangles is licensed with CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/

Jane Austen July

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a student in possession of a summer break, must be in want of a reading challenge.

Okay, maybe not, but if you are looking for a month-long reading challenge and you enjoy a little early 19th century English literature, look no further than Jane Austen July!

Hosted by three Booktubers: Blatantly Bookish, Books and Things, and Spinster’s Library, the challenge has a Goodreads group, read-alongs, and a Bingo card that readers can complete.

The hosts have created 7 challenges, all of which can be completed with materials from MVCC Library!

  1. Read one of Jane Austen’s Six Novels
  2. Read something by Jane Austen that is not one of her main six novels
  3. Read a non fiction work about Jane Austen or her time period, The Late Georgian or Regency Era
  4. Read a modern retelling of a Jane Austen book
  5. Read a Book by a contemporary of Jane Austen (Some examples are Walter Scott, Mary Shelley, and more)
  6. Watch a direct screen adaptation of a Jane Austen Book.
  7. Watch a modern screen adaptation of a Jane Austen Book. (Some examples are Bride and Prejudice and Clueless)

I propose an 8th challenge: Read an article from a peer-reviewed Jane Austen academic journal!

Will you be partaking in this Regency read-a-thon?

#JaneAustenJuly2021 #JaneAustenJuly

Juneteenth: A Celebration of Freedom

Since President Biden just signed the law making Juneteenth a federal holiday, here is a video from our library from 2019 about the Juneteenth holiday.

Talk Description: “Moraine Valley Community College students will learn about the oldest known holiday to commemorate the ending of slavery in the United States. The session will focus on the historical significance and cultural traditions of the forgotten holiday.”

The Science Behind Why We Wear Masks

Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2

Do you remember at the beginning of the pandemic when many were saying that masks don’t protect against Covid-19? At the time, based on a long standing myth in the physics, it was thought that the virus could not be airborne because the particles were too large to remain aerosol. Last summer, a group of scientists challenged that thought which finally lead the World Health Organization and CDC to acknowledge that SARS-CoV-2 is, in fact, airborne. You can read about the origin of the myth and the research that lead to uncovering it in Wired magazine’s article, The 60-Year-Old Scientific Screwup that Helped Covid Kill. You can also read about it in this British Medical Journal editorial, Covid-19 Has Redefined Airborne Transmission or this government document Dismantling Myths on the Airborne Transmission of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). If you would like to do more research on SARS-CoV-2 or any other scientific topic, you can try one of the Moraine Valley Library’s science databases or our nursing and biological science databases. For help with this or any other research inquiries, the librarians are always happy to help. Just Ask a Librarian.

And the Oscar Goes to…

Last night, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (also known as “The Academy”) gave the award for Best Picture of the Year to the movie Nomadland. We don’t own the movie yet, but the library does have copies of Nomadland, the book both in print and as an e-audio book. The book and movie tell the story of a woman who lives out of her van while traveling around the American west looking for work. A few of the actresses in the movie are actual van-dwelling nomads in real life. Hopefully we will have the movie soon, but in the meantime, you can check out some of the previous Best Picture winners from the library. Click on the image below to get to a list with descriptions and available options (including the books if we own them and they share the same name as the film).

Image of theater seats and stage








Examining the relationship between pandemics, extremism, mistrust, and the rejection of authorities

Join history professors Merri Fefles-Dunkle, Josh Fulton, and Jim McIntrye as they explore the role of the state throughout history to help us understand the connection between pandemics and the rise in extremism, mistrust, and rejection of authorities. This event is organized by the MVCC Democracy Commitment.

Women’s History Month 2021

Started in 1978, Women’s History Month observes the contributions of women to culture, history and humankind. President Jimmy Carter first declared the week of March 8 as National Women’s History Week in 1980. The following year, U.S. Congress passed a resolution that made the week a national celebration. In 1987, The National Women’s History Project successfully petitioned Congress to expand the celebration to the entire month of March.

To celebrate check out these free virtual programs being offered by Illinois institutions to recognize some important contributions of women to the world. Registration is required. Click on the title of the program for registration information.

Saturday, March 20, 2021 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm

High Tea at Hall: The Women of Hall Branch — Archivist Beverly Cook will discuss the librarians and patrons of the past from the Chicago Public Library Hall Branch in Bronzeville; including Vivian Harsh (branch manager), Charlemae Hill Rollins (children’s librarian), and Gwendolyn Brooks (patron). 

March 25th, 2021 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Title IX – The Landmark Legislation that Transformed American Sports — Join Jackie Joyner-Kersee, the co-authors of the definitive book on Title IX and others to discuss the impact of the 1972 legislation that vastly expanded opportunities for women in sports at the high school and college levels. Brought to you by the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

March 25, 2021 6:30 pm to 7:30 pm

Virtual Artist Talk: Miranda July on Mail Art — Filmmaker, artist, and author Miranda July and others join for a conversation exploring the history and practice of mail art, a form of art that has re-established itself in this era of social distancing. Hosted by the Art Institute of Chicago.

Source information: https://www.history.com/topics/holidays/womens-history-month, Image credit: https://alltogether.swe.org/2021/02/celebrating-womens-history-month/

Revisiting the Past & Looking to the Future: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion 1919-2021-Dr. Tracy Crump (video)

Special guest Dr. Tracy Crump, Associate Professor of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice at St. Xavier University. Dr. Crump’s talk will consider how to build inclusive spaces in our society by exploring the root causes of social unrest in Chicago over the last century. She will start with the Red Summer of 1919 and move forward.

Tracy Crump holds the Ph.D. in Criminology, Law and Justice from the University of Illinois at Chicago, a juris doctorate from from the John Marshall Law School, and earned the LL.M. (post-JD studies) at Loyola University Chicago School of Law.

Was it really a year like no other? 2020 in Historical Context (video)

The year 2020 was a year to remember, but how unique was it? How does it compare to other historic moments? MVCC history faculty consider these questions. This event is part of the Moraine Valley One Book, One College program.

Are Confederate Monuments History? Assessing the Lost Cause, Monuments, & Race (video)

In recent years, a vigorous debate has occurred online and in the streets over the meaning of monuments to the Confederacy and its leaders during the American Civil War. In this presentation, Associate Professor of History Josh Fulton explores the Lost Cause movement and its efforts to reshape historical memory of the Confederacy and the Civil War through monuments and more.
This event is part of our One Book, One College program.

WP2Social Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com