Graphic Novel Symposium

Graphic Novel Series: Joey Fly, Private Eye in Creepy Crawly Crime

Today I’m featuring a graphic novel called Joey Fly, Private Eye in Creepy Crawly Crime. This one is for audiences of a younger nature, but that doesn’t mean adults can’t enjoy the parody. Have you ever wished you could be a fly a wall? Welcome to Joey Fly’s life. He’s a private eye on a case.

For more information on the graphic novel, I’m adding a book trailer below. Be sure to check it out!

And don’t forget about our upcoming Graphic Novel Symposium happening in the library Thursday, Sept. 18 and Friday, Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

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Banned Books Week and Graphic Novels

BBW2014Banned Books Week is scheduled for September 21-27, 2014, and has a comic book and graphic novel focus this year. Every year the American Library Association (ALA), along with the national book community, celebrates the freedom to read and raises awareness of censorship and banned/challenged books by celebrating Banned Books Week. With MVCC’s Graphic Novel Symposium happening this Thursday and Friday (September 18-19) I thought this article, by Ian Chant from Library Journal, was apropos.

MVCC Library has many of the challenged graphic novels in its collection:

Check them out as we defend your right to read! To see a list of more banned/challenged comic books and graphic novels check out the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund’s (CBLDF) list here. To find out more about Banned Books Week and how you can help prevent censorship check out the CBLDF’s Banned Books Week Handbook, where you can also contribute to the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund.

 

 

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Graphic Novel Series: Palestine

Today I’m featuring a very different kind of graphic novel. Like its name would suggest, Palestine by Joe Sacco is about life in present day Palestine (book was published in 1993 so I’m using present day loosely, although the same problems in this region still unfortunately exist today). Joe Sacco is often called the first comic book journalist and sometimes even a “war junkie.”  He often travels to far places like Palestine, Sarajevo and Bosnia and immerses himself with life in that region to create his graphic novels.

His most recent graphic novel is The Great War (published in 2013), which we unfortunately don’t have in the collection. However, you can read an interesting review of the novel here. You can also find some interviews with Joe Sacco by clicking on the following:

Be sure to check out more information about our upcoming Graphic Novel Symposium happening in the library Thursday, Sept. 18 and Friday, Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

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My Spaceship is a Graphic Novel

The other day I went to Mars.  It was an eerie and confusing place.  Martians were not tiny green men with large black eyes but beings that look similar to ourselves.  Martians and humans travel across the sands in large ships that glide with the power of wind.  There is even a hotdog stand to feed the hungry new inhabitants of the planet with food that reminds them of home.  As Earth humans slowly take over the planet I saw it change from a well established Martian civilization to a planet of small towns made to look like the ones we live in here.  Entire cities built by the Martians become ruins that Earth children play in, it leaves a somber feeling.  They are running around an abandoned city that was once bustling with commerce, lively hoods and the sound of a different species of children laughing. My means of seeing all these intriguing sites was not a NASA top secret new spaceship but a graphic novel I found right here at MVCC.

Ray Bradbury’s The Martian Chronicles: the authorized adaptation  is a graphic novel version of Bradbury’s book of short stories, The Martian Chronicles.   Bradbury was one of the most critically acclaimed American writers of the last century. Many of you may have read his book Fahrenheit 451, a novel about a dystopian civilization were books are outlawed.  This graphic novel was approved by Bradbury, he even wrote the introduction which gives us the reader insight to his fascination with Mars starting at a young age.  With the colorful panels, and easy flow from story to story, its no wonder why he approved of this stunning adaptation of his beloved stories of Mars.

Other works by Ray Bradbury that we have in our collection are below:

Novels: Dandelion wine: a novel, A graveyard for lunatics : another tale of two cities

Short Stories: The Stories of Ray Bradbury, The vintage Bradbury: Ray Bradbury’s own selection of his best stories

Poetry: When elephants last in the dooryard bloomed : celebrations for almost any day in the year

Don’t forget the Graphic Novel Symposium September 18th and 19th!

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Graphic Novel Series: Anya’s Ghost

Anya's GhostToday we’re going to take a look at the graphic novel entitled Anya’s Ghost by Vera Brosgol. This is a fairly new novel (published in 2011) and centers around an adolescent girl named (you may have guessed) Anya. Poor Anya is having a hard time fitting in and making friends until she fells down a well and meets an almost century old ghost. It seems like a happy ending for Anya until things get a little scary.

Neil Gaiman calls it “a masterpiece, of YA literature and of comics.”

It has also won numerous awards such as the 2011 Kirkus Best Teen Book of the Year, School Library Journal Best Fiction Book of 2011, Horn Book Best Fiction Book of 2011, and Winner of the 2012 Eisner Award for Best Publication for Young Adults (Ages 12-17).

Below I have a trailer for the graphic novel. This concept is new for me too, but in case you’re still on the fence about reading the novel, well hopefully this will help you decide!

Be sure to check out more information about our upcoming Graphic Novel Symposium happening in the library Thursday, Sept. 18 and Friday, Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

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Graphic Novel Series: The Sandman

Where to even begin?! The original Sandman series was started in the 1970s by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby. In late 1980s and early 1990s Neil Gaiman revived the series and made it his own. The characters are more or less the same, but Gaiman’s version is very different. We unfortunately don’t have the original Sandman series, but we do have Neil Gaiman’s version. In the collection, we have the Omnibus edition, which means issues 1-37 is in volume 1 while issues 38-75 is in volume 2. That’s a whole lot of Sandman in one volume.

If you’re into reading fantasy, you should definitely check this book out. Even if you’re not, you’ll still probably want to check this book out. In 2007, it made the list for Entertainment Weekly‘s “The New Classics” book list, which is quite an honor for a graphic novel. The story goes through the life of the Sandman (Also known as Dream and Morpheus and yes, I mean the guy that brings you dreams). He is one of the Endless along with six other necessary characters of life (Destiny, Death, Desire, Despair, Delirium who was once Delight, and Destruction).

As it turns out, there are talks of making The Sandman into a feature length film. When asked about it, Neil Gaiman sounded enthusiastic about the prospects of Joseph Gordon-Levitt directing and possibly starring in the film! To read more about it, click here.

Be sure to check out more information about our upcoming Graphic Novel Symposium happening in the library Thursday, Sept. 18 and Friday, Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

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Stories of Survival Told Through Graphic Novel: A.D. New Orleans After the Deluge

Nine years ago New Orleans was challenged by Hurricane Katrina.  Many of us remember the news coverage of citizens on roof tops waiting to be rescued, the stories from those huddled with thousands of others riding out the storm in the Superdome, and the haunting images of neighborhoods washed away.

Non-fiction graphic novel A.D. New Orleans After the Deluge portrays what it was like for citizens of New Orleans before, during, shortly after and years after Katrina.  This graphic novel takes on the task of telling true the stories of five individuals who were affected in different ways by the storm.  One stubborn doctor doesn’t think it will be any worse than other hurricanes and refuses to leave.  A store owner stays behind to guard from possible looters.  Each story vividly portrays the thoughts, emotions and reactions these citizens had toward the storm that tried to take their city.  The end of this novel is inspiring and reminds us that those who call New Orleans home met the challenge of Katrina with strong will and a loyal love of “The Big Easy.”

The author of this novel, Josh Neufeld, went down to New Orleans shortly after Katrina to volunteer with the American Red Cross.  Being a comic writer and journalist he took the stories of those he met and turned them into this heart breaking and inspiring graphic novel.

If you are interested in another non-fiction graphic novel similar to this one I would highly recommend Fax from Sarajevo: A Story of Survival.  It tells the story of a family’s struggles during the Bosnian Conflict.

Don’t forget to check out our Graphic Novel Symposium September 18 and 19 (from 10 a.m to 3:30 p.m.) for interesting lectures and fun activities!

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Graphic Novel Series: A + E 4ever

And now for something completely different. Today I’m featuring A + E 4ever, which is mostly about a friendship between Asher Machnik and Eulalie Mason. I say mostly because there are many other themes, issues and/or conflicts throughout the graphic novel, including but not in any way limited to LGBTQ, identity, labeling, love and friendship.

While researching the graphic novel, I found an interview with the author. I think this one question for the author perfectly sums up what the novel is all about.

How did you come up with the idea for A + E 4ever?

A few years ago, I was working on a couple of novellas, exploring different love situations through different ages and places in life. The overarching theme of the stories was alienation and obsession—‘a + e 4ever’ was the story expressing what I called ‘metalove’ (or love that was essentially un-label-able); the story of a teenage boy with a beautiful girl’s face and the tough girl with a vulnerable boy’s heart who loved him too much. 

This graphic novel isn’t just unique for the themes it addresses, but for the audience it tries to reach. There aren’t very many young adult graphic novels with LGBTQ themes.  For a fascinating interview with the author Ilike Merey, click here.

Be sure to check out more information about our upcoming Graphic Novel Symposium happening in the library Thursday, Sept. 18 and Friday, Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

a plus e 4EVER

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Graphic Novel Series: One Piece

Today we’re covering a completely type of graphic novel, which is manga! We actually have many different manga titles in the library, but today we’ll just feature , which is probably one of the best places to start. The story starts with Monkey D. Luffy and his aspirations to become a pirate and find One Piece (legendary pirate treasure).

One Piece started out as a comic in Japan in 1997. Since then, it has become one of the most popular and best-selling manga in the world. It has sold roughly 345 million print copies worldwide. Now, there’s a TV series and some feature length films in addition to the manga. To watch the animated series, click here. Be warned, some of it is dubbed and some of it is just subtitled. All of it is pretty cool though, and there are more than 600 episodes! In addition, this summer will mark 15 years of One Piece anime. For more information on all the different formats and descriptions of One Piece, click here.

I’ve embedded the very first One Piece anime below. This is by no means replacement for the manga, but it will give you a better idea of the story. It’s only 25 minutes long.

Be sure to check out more information about our upcoming Graphic Novel Symposium happening in the library Thursday, Sept. 18 and Friday, Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

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Graphic Novel Series: V for Vendetta and The Watchman

Although many have heard of the film V for Vendetta, did you know that it was originally a comic? The same thing goes for The Watchman. The creator behind both these popular comics is Alan Moore, who still writes comics in his Northampton home in England. Although both V for Vendetta and The Watchman were successful films, Moore wanted nothing to do with them and purposely wanted his name left out of the credits for both films. You can read more about Moore’s interview with the New York Times. If you’re looking for more information on Alan Moore, be sure to check out Alan Moore: Comics As Performance, Fiction as Scalpel which we have in the library!

Be sure to check out both comics V for Vendetta and The Watchman at the library!

We also have the V for Venetta film in our collection downstairs, which I have already featured in the Film Blog last year.

Be sure to check out more information about our upcoming Graphic Novel Symposium happening in the library Thursday, Sept. 18 and Friday, Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

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