Reflections on Fire: The Symbolic, Sacred & Destructive

A symbol in spiritual beliefs across the world, fire gives light and warmth, it transforms, and it destroys. It is at the center of celebrations and sacraments, but it has also been utilized as a tool of fear and destruction, as in the burning of books. In this talk, Dr. Randy P. Conner asks us to reflect on the significance of fire as he discusses its history and how it has played a role in his own life.

The Physical Implications of Critical Infrastructure Cyberattack

In this talk, Dr. Rush outlines how cyber attacks against critical infrastructure can impact the supply of gas, water, and electric grids. Cyber-attacks are usually thought of as directed against information, such as compromise of passwords, access to financial information, or theft of information. The focus of this talk is on the need to increase the level of protection on critical infrastructure. The issue is viewed from the attacker’s point of view and outlines the physical impacts of a successful attack. This event is part of the STEM lecture series.

Artificial Intelligence & Machine Learning: Realities & Possibilities (video)

There’s a great deal of hype around intelligent systems that identify patterns in data and make decisions. This faculty panel discussion seeks cut through the hype with the goal of helping us understand the current state of machine learning and how this technology will shape the future.This event is part of our One Book program on I, Robot by Isaac Asimov.

The 1919 Chicago Race Riot: A talk by Dr. Eric Allen Hall

In the summer of 1919, the South Side of Chicago erupted in racial violence following the death of Eugene Williams, an African-American youth who had mistakenly drifted into the “white” section of Lake Michigan’s 29th Street Beach. By the time the fires were extinguished a week later, thirty-eight people had been killed and thousands more had seen their homes destroyed. It would be the worst of over twenty race riots that plagued the United States during what came to be known as “Red Summer.” Dr. Eric Allen hall Associate Professor of History at Norther Illinois University will examine the causes, events, and legacy of the 1919 Chicago Race Riot through the experiences of those who witnessed the violence.

Evaluating the Primary and Caucus System (video)

Political Science Professor Dr. Deron Schreck will examine the unique process in the U.S. of nominating presidential candidates. The United States will begin the 2020 nomination process starting with the Iowa Caucus on February 3rd 2020. This event will examine primaries, caucuses, delegates, superdelegates, and answer questions you may have about the 2020 Election.

Avicenna: The Often Forgotten Philosopher (video

In this lecture, Professor of Communications and Literature, Dr. Amani Wazwaz discusses the life and contributions of the physician and scholar Avicenna (Ibn Sina). She explains his contributions to Philosophy and his influences on European Philosophers such as St. Thomas Aquinas. This presentation continues the lecture series begun by MOSAICS Building Bridges Program.

MVCC:POV Release Discussion

Join us to celebrate the release of season two of MVCC:POV Voices from the Valley featuring guests the GASP Club (season two), Muslim Student Association (season one), and Arab Student Union (season one). We’ll be chatting with students and advisers about their experiences participating in the podcast.

Author José Ángel N. in Discussion with MVCC Students

Celebrated author José Ángel N. joined MVCC Social Psychology students for a discussion on his life and his writing. Students from Amy Williamson’s psychology class prepared questions as part of their course.

Particle Accelerators: Probing the Universe with the World’s Highest Energy Collisions

The universe we live in is approximately 14 billion years old and has undergone many phases of transformation. The exact laws of its structure and formation remain largely unknown to us. One way to understand them is to re-create the conditions of the early universe when the matter was very dense and hot. This can be achieved in our days using high energy particle accelerators and colliders. In this talk I will present big questions particle physicists are facing today and explain how we try to address them using the data from accelerators, such as the Tevatron at Fermilab and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. This talk is part of the STEM Lecture Series.