Equity

Women’s History Month 2021

Started in 1978, Women’s History Month observes the contributions of women to culture, history and humankind. President Jimmy Carter first declared the week of March 8 as National Women’s History Week in 1980. The following year, U.S. Congress passed a resolution that made the week a national celebration. In 1987, The National Women’s History Project successfully petitioned Congress to expand the celebration to the entire month of March.

To celebrate check out these free virtual programs being offered by Illinois institutions to recognize some important contributions of women to the world. Registration is required. Click on the title of the program for registration information.

Saturday, March 20, 2021 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm

High Tea at Hall: The Women of Hall Branch — Archivist Beverly Cook will discuss the librarians and patrons of the past from the Chicago Public Library Hall Branch in Bronzeville; including Vivian Harsh (branch manager), Charlemae Hill Rollins (children’s librarian), and Gwendolyn Brooks (patron). 

March 25th, 2021 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Title IX – The Landmark Legislation that Transformed American Sports — Join Jackie Joyner-Kersee, the co-authors of the definitive book on Title IX and others to discuss the impact of the 1972 legislation that vastly expanded opportunities for women in sports at the high school and college levels. Brought to you by the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

March 25, 2021 6:30 pm to 7:30 pm

Virtual Artist Talk: Miranda July on Mail Art — Filmmaker, artist, and author Miranda July and others join for a conversation exploring the history and practice of mail art, a form of art that has re-established itself in this era of social distancing. Hosted by the Art Institute of Chicago.

Source information: https://www.history.com/topics/holidays/womens-history-month, Image credit: https://alltogether.swe.org/2021/02/celebrating-womens-history-month/

1919 author, Eve L. Ewing, on Charter Schools

If you’ve been following our One Book, One College programming this year, you already know Eve L. Ewing, author of 1919 and other books and articles.  A couple of weeks ago, her opinion piece, Can We Stop Fighting about Charter Schools? was published in The New York Times. As a sociologist and educator, she is often asked about her thoughts on the topic. In this piece she argues that, we need “political leaders to abandon some of the principles that have guided education policy in our generation.” She says “we need to replace the fight over charter schools with the assertion that every child deserves a great school,” and to do that, we need to take “seriously the ‘educators don’t get paid enough’ realizations of 2020” and address “the teacher shortage that is going to worsen in the aftermath of the pandemic,” (Ewing, 2021).

If the topic of charter schools interest you, the library can help. You can find books on charter schools in our library catalog.  If you are looking for articles, our education databases are a good place to start. You can also find articles on the topic in our news databases and many of our multiple subject databases. When in doubt, be sure to Ask a Librarian!

Ewing, E. L. (2021, Feb 22). Can we stop fighting about charter schools? New York Times (Online) Retrieved from https://go.openathens.net/redirector/morainevalley.edu?url=https://www.proquest.com/newspapers/can-we-stop-fighting-about-charter-schools/docview/2493195195/se-2?accountid=1977

Revisiting the Past & Looking to the Future: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion 1919-2021-Dr. Tracy Crump (video)

Special guest Dr. Tracy Crump, Associate Professor of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice at St. Xavier University. Dr. Crump’s talk will consider how to build inclusive spaces in our society by exploring the root causes of social unrest in Chicago over the last century. She will start with the Red Summer of 1919 and move forward.

Tracy Crump holds the Ph.D. in Criminology, Law and Justice from the University of Illinois at Chicago, a juris doctorate from from the John Marshall Law School, and earned the LL.M. (post-JD studies) at Loyola University Chicago School of Law.

An Interview with Haki R. Madhubuti: Taught by Women & other Writers (video)

Haki R. Madhubuti is a poet, publisher, and public intellectual. He is the founder of Third World Press which is the largest, independent, African-American owned press in the United States. In this interview, MVCC’s Dewitt Scott interviews Mr. Madhubuti on his new book Taught By Women: Poems as Resistance Language New and Selected as well as discussing his life and work.

Eve Ewing’s 1919: A Critical Conversation with Dr. Janice Tuck Lively (video)

A discussion on Eve Ewing’s poetry in her book 1919. In this interview, MVCC Counselor Shanya Gray interviews Dr. Janice Tuck Lively of Professor of English at Elmhurst College and author of fiction and non-fiction. This talk is part of our One Book, One College program on Ewing’s 1919.

International Day of Women and Girls in Science

The United Nations has designated February 11th as International Day of Women and Girls in Science, a day that highlights how important it is to encourage a new generation of women to enter into the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) fields. International Day of Women and Girls in Science aims to break down harmful stereotypes and narratives as well as promote policies that makes STEM fields more accessible to women and girls.

How Can You Celebrate Women in Science?

Introduce Girls and Young Women to STEM Careers

  • Moraine Valley supports women entering technology fields with its Women in Technology Mentoring program.
  • Know a girl entering eighth grade? She might want to sign up for Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day on February 20th at Argonne National Laboratory.
  • Girls aged 10-18 can get involved with Girls 4 Science, a non-profit dedicated to getting young women in Chicago involved in the STEM fields.

Deconstructing Home: The Journey that Challenged a Hometown Identity

Kipp Cozad grew up in Liberty, Missouri, a town with an infamous past connected to Bleeding Kansas and Jesse James. One piece of history that Kipp did not recognize was his home town’s history of institutional segregation. After joining the Peace Corps and serving in Yemen, the illusions around his hometown were shattered. His perspectives on “normal” had changed. In this talk, Kipp will explore how travel and living in a new culture forced him to see both his hometown and the world differently.

MVCC:POV Release Discussion

Join us to celebrate the release of season two of MVCC:POV Voices from the Valley featuring guests the GASP Club (season two), Muslim Student Association (season one), and Arab Student Union (season one). We’ll be chatting with students and advisers about their experiences participating in the podcast.

Fired Up About Getting Fired: Workplace Discrimination Against the LGBTQ+ Community

The U.S. Supreme Court will begin hearing oral arguments regarding the legality of workplace discrimination against people who identify as LGBTQ+. Join sociology professor Jeffrey McCully as they explore the history of workplace discrimination targeting the LGBTQ+ community and legislative attempts to end it. Sponsored by Celebrating Diversity Committee, ¡GASP! club, and Democracy Commitment.

WP2Social Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com