E-Resources

A Quick Guide To Speech Resources

Do you have a speech coming up? The MVCC Library has a variety of resources at your fingertips. Click on the image below to see sources for researching your Informative and Persuasive speech topics and for Finding Evidence to support your claims.

A Quick guide to speech resources

Screen time and the brain

“Headaches, anxiety and exhaustion caused by screen time that never ends is not just for adults anymore.”

A CNN study showed 80 percent of teenagers check their phones on the hour, and 72 percent need to respond to their messages right away. Teens also preferred texting rather than speaking and often used a device to “save and protect” them from social interactions. Harvard research in 2019 revealed that too much screen time can “interfere with sleep and creativity.” It is not only teenagers–have you felt compelled to leave your phone at home or feel a sense of terror, or relief, when you did? Do you purposefully move your phone across the room or turn it off to get away? Are you exhausted, easily distracted and constantly multi-tasking online and in “real life”?

Take a break says Dr. Michael Rich who also suggests:

Put down your device. Be present with others. Observe the world around you. Let your mind wander. Avoid blue light-emitting screen use before bedtime.

Find sources and additional readings on this topic below:

Screen Time and the Brain

Shirolkar, Shivani. “Screened in: Cell Phones Dictate our Lives.” University Wire, 22 Mar 2017. SIRS Issues Researcherhttps://go.openathens.net/redirector/morainevalley.edu?url=https://explore.proquest.com/sirsissuesresearcher/document/2265372339?accountid=1977.

US teens use screens more than seven hours a day on average – and that’s not including school work

Kelly, Heather. “With Remote Learning, it’s Now Screen Time all the Time.” Washington Post, 06 Sep 2020. SIRS Issues Researcherhttps://go.openathens.net/redirector/morainevalley.edu?url=https://explore.proquest.com/sirsissuesresearcher/document/2453819623?accountid=1977.

Photo: “Screen Time” by A.Davey is licensed with CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/

Our Shared Shelf 3: Learning, Immigration, Writing, Girls in School

Librarians Sharon and Hannah recommend items from the MVCC Library collections! In this episode we talk about: 
1) The New Science of Learning by Terry Doyle and Todd Zakrajsek.
2) Illegal by Jose Angel N
3) They Say, I Say by Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein, and Russel Durst
4) How Girls Achieve by Sally A. Nuamah

The Virtual Rainbow Reception

The Celebrating Diversity Task Group’s LGBTQ+ Subcommittee is hosting the annual Rainbow Reception virtually this year! On Monday, February 1st you can learn about the different resources on campus available to LGBTQIA+ students. Join via WebEx. You can also show your pride by ordering a t-shirt!

After the reception, check out some of the resources available at the library with this selection of books, audiobooks, and graphic novels. Click on the image to view the collection:

Pride Month eReads

Best Books of 2020

Looking for something to read over Winter break? Check out the titles considered some of the best of 2020 by the New York Public Library and the Chicago Public Library. Click on the title or link below for a book summary. If you are new to Hoopla–create an account using your MVCC email, select Moraine Valley Community College as your library and use your MVCC username in place of a library card number. For help with Hoopla click here or Ask a Librarian. For Library Winter break hours click here.

The Aosawa Murders by Riku Onda (e-book)

The Bear by Andrew Krivak (e-book)

Children of the Land by Marcelo Hernandez Castillo (book)

Everywhere You Don’t Belong: A Novel by Gabriel Bump (e-book)

Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot by Mikki Kendall (e-book)

Hurricane Season: A Novel by Fernanda Melchor, translated by Sophie Hughes

https://encore.morainevalley.edu/iii/encore/record/C__Rb430510 (e-book)

Interior Chinatown: A Novel by Charles Yu (book)

Little Gods: A Novel by Meng Jin (book)

Long Bright River: A Novel by Liz Moore (book)

Overground Railroad: The Green Book and the Roots of Black Travel in America

by Candacy A. Taylor

https://encore.morainevalley.edu/iii/encore/record/C__Rb672595 (e-pub full-text)
https://encore.morainevalley.edu/iii/encore/record/C__Rb708526 (e-book Hoopla)

Such a Fun Age: A Novel by Kiley Reid (book)

Supreme Inequality: The Supreme Court’s Fifty-year Battle for a More Unjust America by Adam Cohen (book)

Temporary: A Novel by Hilary Leichter (e-book)

Upright Women Wanted by Sarah Gailey (e-audiobook)

Writers & Lovers: A Novel by Lily King (e-book)

Chicago Public Library Best of the Best 2020

New York Public Library Best Books of 2020

Take a Break in Tokyo

If the thought of immersing yourself in a far away place appeals, even while we must stay close to home, step outside the everyday with this virtual display of e-books and e-audiobooks from the library that explore these surreal, tender, and humorous examples of contemporary Japanese fiction.

Contemporary Japanese Fiction

If further exploration of contemporary Japan appeals to you, the hypnotic and beautiful videos of Japan on the YouTube channel run by the anonymous Rambalac are an unusual and captivating glimpse of everyday life.

In the middle of the lockdown last Spring, I stumbled across a recommendation for Rambalac’s channel, which posts ‘walking videos.’ Rambalac records themselves walking around Tokyo’s districts, neighborhoods, and suburbs–other Japanese cities and locations appear periodically. There are videos recorded during the day and at night, in rain and snow. Rambalac describes the videos as “Not a vlog, no intrusive faces or talking, pure Japan only.” 

During the lockdown, I loved being able to get such an (extra)ordinary glimpse of an unfamiliar place even while I was stuck at home–in a more visual, but no less compelling way than in the Japanese fiction in the above display. Try Sakura in snow, recorded last April, or this night walk, to get a feel for the hypnotic calm and the vibrant glimpses of contemporary Japan.

Shake Up Your Table

2020 is the year of “new”. New rules, new regulations, new tech, new ideas about health and safety. How about new food traditions? Why not try something different this year? MVCC has a variety of cookbooks, and plenty available digitally, so you don’t have to make a trip to the library. Here’s a small selection of cookbooks that might spice up your table this season. Check out our book catalog for more!

Don’t forget that you can always contact a librarian for help finding more resources like these!

Cook Something New

1984

“The dystopia described in George Orwell’s nearly 70-year-old novel 1984 suddenly feels all too familiar. A world in which Big Brother (or maybe the National Security Agency) is always listening in, and high-tech devices can eavesdrop in people’s homes. (Hey, Alexa, what’s up?)  A world in which the government insists that reality is not “something objective, external, existing in its own right” — but rather, “whatever the Party holds to be truth is truth.” The perfect storm of 2020 is a tense presidential election, a pandemic that sees no end in sight and social upheaval that permeates every corner of the country. It may seem that reading this novel at this time may be counter-productive to one’s mental health. Perhaps it is paramount that we try to understand the past to find solutions to the future. “Today, 1984 reads more than a novel; it’s a prophecy that will sting you with parallels that still hold true some seven decades later.”

Sign into the MVCC Hoopla app and check out a 1984 e-book or a 1984 audio book by George Orwell. Or, perhaps you may want to watch a streaming video of 1984 also on Hoopla. I also plan to read the e-book On 1984. This book discusses the division in America and the similarities of 1984 to our present world.

VOTE!

Access Denied

Have you ever found an interesting article in your social media, but you couldn’t read it without unblocking ads or subscribing to the publication?  I had this happen to me recently when I found an interesting article entitled Can Books Compete With Netflix? Yes, and Here’s Why. It was published in the Wall Street Journal so when I tried to open it, I hit a paywall. Instead of paying for a subscription, I remembered that I can check to see if it’s in our Wall Street Journal database.  Did you know that we have access to 100’s of magazine and and academic journals through our databases?  You just need to go to our Research Tools page and either go to “All Databases” or choose a subject category underneath.

Partial view of the of the Research Databases List with a red arrow pointing toward All Databases

The Wall Street Journal database is under “News”.  I did a search in the database for the article title, and I found it!  Some publications don’t allow access to ALL of their articles so sometimes you may not be able to find what you are looking for.  If that ever happens, the library can order the article from other libraries through our Interlibrary loan form, but sometimes, we may be able to find it in one of our other databases. The librarians are always happy to help, so please Ask a Librarian for help. If the article I was looking for interests you, here is a link to it in the WSJ database. Can Books Compete with Netflix? To read it, you will need to log in with your MV user name and password.

Celebrate Indigenous Authors

In honor of Indigenous Peoples’ Day, Monday, October 12th, 2020, explore this selection of works by Native American authors available at the library, in print and online.

If you are curious about the history of Indigenous People’s Day, which was first celebrated in Berkeley, California in 1992 and is observed in an increasing number of cities and states, check out the American Indian Center of Chicago’s page.

Click on the virtual display below to view selected works:

Celebrate Indigenous Authors
WP2Social Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com