Covid-19

The Science Behind Why We Wear Masks

Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2

Do you remember at the beginning of the pandemic when many were saying that masks don’t protect against Covid-19? At the time, based on a long standing myth in the physics, it was thought that the virus could not be airborne because the particles were too large to remain aerosol. Last summer, a group of scientists challenged that thought which finally lead the World Health Organization and CDC to acknowledge that SARS-CoV-2 is, in fact, airborne. You can read about the origin of the myth and the research that lead to uncovering it in Wired magazine’s article, The 60-Year-Old Scientific Screwup that Helped Covid Kill. You can also read about it in this British Medical Journal editorial, Covid-19 Has Redefined Airborne Transmission or this government document Dismantling Myths on the Airborne Transmission of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). If you would like to do more research on SARS-CoV-2 or any other scientific topic, you can try one of the Moraine Valley Library’s science databases or our nursing and biological science databases. For help with this or any other research inquiries, the librarians are always happy to help. Just Ask a Librarian.

Understanding Covid-19 Vaccines

This week, I was thankfully able to receive my second dose of the Pfizer vaccine for Covid-19. I am truly grateful to all of the scientists, and production and healthcare workers that made this possible. The Covid-19 vaccines that we now have available to us are nothing short of a scientific breakthrough and are a real showcase of human achievement. This amazing piece from the New York Times, How Pfizer Makes Its Covid-19 Vaccine, explains the science behind the vaccine and looks at the testing, safety, and quality controls involved in the development and production of the vaccine.

Pfizer understood from the beginning that it was science that was going to save the world from this pandemic. They gave their scientists everything they needed, no questions asked, to get the job done. In this National Geographic video, Mission Possible: The Race for a Vaccine, you can learn about the science, development, testing, security, and production involved in getting this shot into the arms of the world.

Covid-19 Vaccines: The Science & the Psychology (Video)

Faculty members discuss the biology, public health aspects, and the psychological factors around the Covid-19 vaccines in the United States. This panel is organized by the MVCC Library. Panel members include: Judy Corcoran, Nursing Laura Lauzen-Collins, Psychology Peter Porter, Biology The discussion is moderated by librarians Hannah Carlton and Troy Swanson.
Don’t miss our 2020 panel “Racial Health Disparities: Equity in the Light of Covid-19

Pandemic Poster Art

“A poster is a temporary promotion of an idea, product, or event put up in a public space for mass consumption. Typically, posters include both textual and graphic elements, although a poster may be either wholly graphical or wholly text.” With our current technology, posters are not a necessary tool to help spread information but perhaps because of the overload of information that comes across our computer screens, a simple visual sign just might be an effective attention-getter. Covid 19 posters are found in public building like libraries, hospitals, and schools. By comparison, the 1918 Pandemic posters were pasted on buildings, bars, theaters, and train stations.

Regardless of 2021 technology, “the work of artists has been a central platform of how society responds to times of great social change.” Check out some interesting links on the use of poster art during pandemic crises.

Pandemic Posters Through the Years

The posters created by Wisconsin artists during the COVID-19 pandemic will become part of the collections at the Society where they can be used by future generations.

Canadian Poster Art

Poster Art from Underserved Communities (Click on PDF version)

What does “vaccine efficacy” mean?

With the third Covid-19 vaccine approved by the FDA, there has been a great of talk comparing “vaccine efficacy” rates. You may be trying to figure out what all of this means? What is “vaccine efficacy” and can we use it to compare the different vaccines? Well, this NY Times article “What Do Vaccine Efficacy Numbers Actually Mean?”really helps. Ihttps://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/03/03/science/vaccine-efficacy-coronavirus.html?smid=url-sharet offers some clear explanations.

Was it really a year like no other? 2020 in Historical Context (video)

The year 2020 was a year to remember, but how unique was it? How does it compare to other historic moments? MVCC history faculty consider these questions. This event is part of the Moraine Valley One Book, One College program.

COVID-19 Homepage Takeover on NBCNews

Today, NBC News is shining attention on the impact of COVID and calling attention to what we can do. They are doing a “homepage takeover” where their usual page full of news has been replaced with reporting on COVID. We are in the midst of the most difficult time of this pandemic. According Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Robert Redfield, who said that the next few months will be “the most difficult in the public health of this nation.”

The Bubonic Plague: The Ultimate Pandemic (video)

History faculty member Jim McIntyre provides an overview of the history of one of the most deadly pandemics in history, the bubonic plague or the black death. This discussion reviews key outbreaks and the impacts they had in history. This is set in light of the current, Covid-19 pandemic.

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