Covid-19

Covid-19 Vaccines: The Science & the Psychology (Video)

Faculty members discuss the biology, public health aspects, and the psychological factors around the Covid-19 vaccines in the United States. This panel is organized by the MVCC Library. Panel members include: Judy Corcoran, Nursing Laura Lauzen-Collins, Psychology Peter Porter, Biology The discussion is moderated by librarians Hannah Carlton and Troy Swanson.
Don’t miss our 2020 panel “Racial Health Disparities: Equity in the Light of Covid-19

Pandemic Poster Art

“A poster is a temporary promotion of an idea, product, or event put up in a public space for mass consumption. Typically, posters include both textual and graphic elements, although a poster may be either wholly graphical or wholly text.” With our current technology, posters are not a necessary tool to help spread information but perhaps because of the overload of information that comes across our computer screens, a simple visual sign just might be an effective attention-getter. Covid 19 posters are found in public building like libraries, hospitals, and schools. By comparison, the 1918 Pandemic posters were pasted on buildings, bars, theaters, and train stations.

Regardless of 2021 technology, “the work of artists has been a central platform of how society responds to times of great social change.” Check out some interesting links on the use of poster art during pandemic crises.

Pandemic Posters Through the Years

The posters created by Wisconsin artists during the COVID-19 pandemic will become part of the collections at the Society where they can be used by future generations.

Canadian Poster Art

Poster Art from Underserved Communities (Click on PDF version)

What does “vaccine efficacy” mean?

With the third Covid-19 vaccine approved by the FDA, there has been a great of talk comparing “vaccine efficacy” rates. You may be trying to figure out what all of this means? What is “vaccine efficacy” and can we use it to compare the different vaccines? Well, this NY Times article “What Do Vaccine Efficacy Numbers Actually Mean?”really helps. Ihttps://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/03/03/science/vaccine-efficacy-coronavirus.html?smid=url-sharet offers some clear explanations.

Was it really a year like no other? 2020 in Historical Context (video)

The year 2020 was a year to remember, but how unique was it? How does it compare to other historic moments? MVCC history faculty consider these questions. This event is part of the Moraine Valley One Book, One College program.

COVID-19 Homepage Takeover on NBCNews

Today, NBC News is shining attention on the impact of COVID and calling attention to what we can do. They are doing a “homepage takeover” where their usual page full of news has been replaced with reporting on COVID. We are in the midst of the most difficult time of this pandemic. According Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Robert Redfield, who said that the next few months will be “the most difficult in the public health of this nation.”

The Bubonic Plague: The Ultimate Pandemic (video)

History faculty member Jim McIntyre provides an overview of the history of one of the most deadly pandemics in history, the bubonic plague or the black death. This discussion reviews key outbreaks and the impacts they had in history. This is set in light of the current, Covid-19 pandemic.

How America Lost 200,000+ Lives to Covid-19

The United States has been preparing for a pandemic like Covid-19 for 15 years. The U.S. wrote the global pandemic playbook that lays out instructions for testing, contact tracing, masks, social distancing and communications. So how is it that the United States, one of the wealthiest countries in the world, and seemingly the most prepared, accounts for 20% of Covid-19 deaths while having only 4% of the global population?

The New York Times took a deep dive into the data and the 15 year timeline to examine why we’ve wound up with so many preventable deaths. They share what they found in this video, America Wrote the Pandemic Playbook, Then Ignored It.

Six-Word Memoirs

Can a story be told in only six words? Consider these six. “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” This story has been attributed to Ernest Hemingway who it is said made a bet with friends that he could write a story using only six words. It is also said that he won that bet. There is considerable doubt as to the veracity of this Hemingway attribution, but nonetheless, it is indeed a very moving story –and very short story. 

Recently, The New York Times has been asking people to write their own really short stories, or six-word memoirs, about their experiences during COVID and quarantine. In only six words, people have managed to depict our times and tell the story of the pandemic. Here are a few that they’ve collected:

  • Cleaned Lysol container with Lysol wipe. 
  • Fall wardrobe refresh — three new masks. 
  • Tired of hearing, “Mark, you’re muted.” 
  • My dog loves having us home.
  • Freedom comes through following the rules.
  • Same earrings, six months, why change
  • Apparently, rock bottom has a basement.
  • I am smiling under this mask.
  • Working from home. Bored. Lonely. Lucky.
  • Stayed in, needed less, valued more.

What about you? If you were to write your six-word memoir right now, what would it be? Send an email to handk3@morainevalley.edu, or comment if you are seeing this on social media, and I’ll share our MVCC memoirs in a future post. Here’s one that is a variation of a t-shirt that I bought for my son.

2020: less toilet paper, more Zoom

History, Epidemics, and How Governments Respond (video)

With concern over the Covid-19 Pandemic dominating all aspects of society, join political science and history faculty members Kevin Navratil, Jim McIntyre and Josh Fulton for a discussion of how the United States has grappled with disease outbreaks in the past. From Yellow Fever to Spanish Flu, come understand how Americans coped and how governments sought to combat the threats of disease.

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