Kelly Hand

The Number 1 Way to Fight Climate Change

We’ve been talking about climate change a lot this year, as we highlight issues from this year’s One Book One College selection All We Can Save. It’s a book that addresses the seriousness of our situation, but it’s also a book of inspiration. There are many people, from all walks of life, doing great work toward tackling the problem.

For those of us that are encouraged to act, we’ve learned about various things that we can do. We can make green energy choices in our homes and modes of transportation. We can make climate friendly food choices. We can buy less stuff. We can plant trees, or tackle something like my latest project, which is building a butterfly garden in my backyard.

All of these things are vitally important. But in all honesty, they are not enough. The problem is so much bigger than what we as individuals can do. The problem of climate change is systemic and the real change that needs to happen is at the government and corporate level. This means that the number one thing that we can do to fight climate change is to apply pressure, and not let leaders look away from the problem. With our actions, our dollars, or our votes we can support the groups that are doing this kind of work, like the authors featured in All We Can Save.

“It is time to stop focusing on what government can do and start recognizing the critical role we all play in making government do its job.” Gina McCarthy, “Public Service for Public Health, All We Can Save

Here are a couple of great discussions about the need to keep talking about climate change to help bring about the systemic change that we need.

New York Times Podcast

Got Climate Doom? Here’s What You Can Do To Actually Make a Difference

TEDTalk

Here are a number of organizations that are doing this work.

Sunrise Movement 

350.org

Environmental Voter Project

Drawdown

Climate Power

Fridays for Future

Evergreen Action

Earthday.org

Sierra Club Beyond Coal

Greenpeace

And to leave you with a just a bit more inspiration from Paul McCartney, Jon Bon Jovi, Sean Paul and many, many more artists–Love Song to the Earth.

Moraine Valley Authors’ Display

Each year the MVCC Library is pleased to display the published works of Moraine Valley Community College faculty and staff. Please enjoy this virtual display of all of the hard work and creativity of this year’s participants. Featured are works produced anytime during 2021 including articles, books, conference presentations, music, poetry, and short stories. We are delighted to showcase all of this amazing work!

Beyond Academic Search Complete

The MVCC Library databases are a tremendous resource. They provide free access to thousands of magazines, newspapers, academic journals, reference materials, and even videos that are not available through Google or other search engines. Academic Search Complete is often a go-to database for library users. It’s the one that is being searched if you use the Articles search box on the library homepage.

Academic Search Complete is pretty great and it covers all subject areas. But sometimes when searching, it can be helpful to use a more specialized database. This is where the All Databases page on the library website comes in handy. Here you will find an A to Z list of all of the library’s ~100 databases. You’ll also be able to use the subject groupings of databases.

So, if you’re researching currents events, or sports information, or films, you may want to use the News databases. This way you’ll be searching only newspapers. If you’re looking into something like management practices at McDonalds, you could go into the Business grouping and select Business Source Premier. Or if you’re working on a feasibility study or a business plan, Reference Solutions is going to give lots of information about potential competitors and clients. The blurbs for these databases help you choose the best one for your research need.

By now you might be thinking that this is getting a little complicated. There are so many different databases, you must need to be an expert to know how to search them all. Not at all. Business Source Premier for example, works just like Academic Search Complete, as do many of the library’s databases. Plus, to help you get started using various databases, librarians have created help guides for many of the library’s databases. Just look for the link at the end of the database description.

Are you interested in a database guide that we haven’t created yet? Let us know and we’ll make one!

Ask a Librarian

Agriculture and Climate Change

The One Book One College selection this year, All We Can Save, takes a look at the threat of climate change. When we think about climate change, we often focus on energy use. That is important, but it’s not the whole picture. A huge contributor to the problem is agriculture. It’s a triple threat. Plowing releases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Fertilizing is a source of nitrous oxide. Cattle release methane. All of these together amount to about a third of all the greenhouse gases leading to human-caused changes in climate.

The food choices that we make matter a lot. And big changes need to happen in the agriculture industry. The New York Times released the first video today that is part of a series called “We’re Cooked.” Part 1, “Meet the People Getting Paid to Kill Our Planet,” takes a hard look at the agricultural lobby in the US. You can watch all of the videos as they are released here. And don’t forget to sign up for your free subscription to the New York Times through the MVCC Library.

To find out more about food and climate change, check out these titles from the MVCC Library.

Chicago–The Candy Capital of the World

Halloween is almost here. Getting to dress up in costumes is only part of the holiday fun. Because let’s face it, Halloween is also about the candy. Did you know that a lot of the candy that fills trick-or-treaters’ buckets has a history in Chicago?

Tootsie Rolls, M&Ms, Snickers, Brach’s, Wrigley, Lemonheads, Red Hots, Baby Ruths, Butterfingers, Jolly Ranchers, Milk Duds, Cracker Jack, the list goes on and on. These candies and many more are Chicago products. Even Hershey owes its start to Chicago, since it was at the1893 Chicago World’s Fair that Milton Hershey got the idea to start his own chocolate company. Chicago has long been known as the Candy Capital of the World, having been throughout most of its history the producer of one third of all the candy made in the United States.

Learn more about Chicago’s delicious history in the book Chicago’s Sweet Candy History, by Leslie Goddard. You can also find more histories of candy here in the MVCC Library collection.

Frida Kahlo Exhibit

The Frida Kahlo exhibit that spent the summer at nearby College of DuPage was impressive and drew visitors from all 50 states and 42 countries. In case you were unable to enjoy the event in person, or would like to revisit some of what you experienced, this virtual tour is a great way to connect with the exhibit. Through exhibit photos and narrative, the curator walks us through Frida’s difficult life and then helps the viewer engage with a few of the paintings on display. We also see reproductions of Frida Kahlo’s garden and house. Frida Kahlo Timeless Virtual Tour

To engage even further with the life and works of the artist, check out the MVCC Library’s collection on Frida Kahlo.

A Better Way to Evaluate Online Information

Are you looking to up your game in the evaluation of online information? Bestselling author John Green wants to help!

Misinformation, disinformation, fake news, and conspiracies have become so common that we stumble across these all the time in our web searches and in our news feeds. And it’s getting harder and harder to evaluate the information that we find. Really bad information is often presented in a professional looking manner with a great looking list of references. Those old checklists just don’t work anymore.

What we really need to do is find out who is behind the information and why they want us to see it. A great way to do this is to leave the webpage we’re on, open a new tab, and google the person or organization presenting the information. Instead of reading vertically, up and down the page we found, we need to read laterally, across the web, to find out what other people have to say about the presenter.

Here’s where John Green comes into the picture. His Crash Course YouTube series has produced a collection in collaboration with researchers at Stanford University to help us learn more about how misinformation is spread and to demonstrate how to use lateral reading skills to evaluate online information. The videos are really engaging and really helpful.

Check out the first Navigating Digital Information video below. As always, the MVCC Library has lots of helpful information as well. Click here for a sample.

Questions for Librarians

Did you ever have a question that you weren’t sure you should ask us? Guess what — of course you should ask! Librarians love to get questions. People ask librarians about all sorts of things. The graphic below gives an idea of what students have been asking the MVCC librarians recently. Do you have a question about research, about using the library, about something on campus? Are you wondering what kinds of pets the librarians have? Ask a Librarian!

Understanding Covid-19 Vaccines

This week, I was thankfully able to receive my second dose of the Pfizer vaccine for Covid-19. I am truly grateful to all of the scientists, and production and healthcare workers that made this possible. The Covid-19 vaccines that we now have available to us are nothing short of a scientific breakthrough and are a real showcase of human achievement. This amazing piece from the New York Times, How Pfizer Makes Its Covid-19 Vaccine, explains the science behind the vaccine and looks at the testing, safety, and quality controls involved in the development and production of the vaccine.

Pfizer understood from the beginning that it was science that was going to save the world from this pandemic. They gave their scientists everything they needed, no questions asked, to get the job done. In this National Geographic video, Mission Possible: The Race for a Vaccine, you can learn about the science, development, testing, security, and production involved in getting this shot into the arms of the world.

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