What’s New Wednesday’s: Environmental Theme

This week’s new book recommendations have an environmental theme; the photos alone in “Plastic Soup” will tug at the heartstrings.

  • Plastic Soup : an Atlas of Ocean Pollution / by Michiel Roscam Abbing. “A beautifully-illustrated survey of the plastics clogging our seas, their impacts on wildlife and people around the world, and inspirational initiatives designed to tackle the problem.”–Publisher description.
  • How to Give Up Plastic : a Guide to Changing the World, One Plastic Bottle at a Time / by Will McCallum. “An accessible guide to the changes we can all make–small and large–to rid our lives of disposable plastic and clean up the world’s oceans. It takes 450 years for a plastic bottle to fully biodegrade, and there are around 12.7 million tons of plastic entering the ocean each year. At our current pace, in the year 2050 there could be more plastic in the oceans than fish, by weight.”–Publisher description.
  • The Conscious Closet : the Revolutionary Guide to Looking Good While Doing Good / by Elizabeth L. Cline. “‘The Conscious Closet’ is not just a style guide. It is a call to action to transform one of the most polluting industries on earth–fashion–into a force for good. Readers will learn where and how their clothes are made, before connecting to a passionate global community of stylish fashion revolutionaries.”–Publisher description.

All of these books are currently available on our New Arrivals shelves in the Library Lounge. Enjoy!

If you have trouble finding any of these books, don’t hesitate to “Ask a Librarian” for help. They can also place any of these books on hold if interested.

What’s New?

The Library has every movie adaptation of A Star is Born to suit one’s fancy! Check them out:

  • A Star is Born (1937) / directed by William A. Wellman ; produced by David O. Selznick ; starring Janet Gaynor & Fredric March
  • A Star is Born (1954) / produced by Sidney Luft ; directed by George Cukor ; starring Judy Garland & James Mason
  • A Star is Born (1976) / produced by Jon Peters ; directed by Frank Pierson ; starring Barbra Streisand & Kris Kristofferson
  • A Star is Born (2018) / directed by Bradley Cooper ; produced by Bill Gerber, Jon Peters, Bradley Cooper, Todd Phillips, Lynette Howell Taylor ; starring Lady Gaga & Bradley Cooper  

All are currently available and located either at the New Arrivals section in the lounge, or downstairs among the DVD collection. If you can’t find one of the DVDs, please don’t hesitate to ask a librarian for assistance.

New Arrivals

Among the new arrivals this week are these book recommendations:

These and other new items are located at the New Arrivals section in the Library Lounge.

New Books This Week

We have something of interest for everyone!

Health Science students:

  • The 21st Century Guide to Writing Articles in the Biomedical Sciences by Shiri Diskin: “We live in an unprecedented era of flourishing of scientific publishing. However, many professionals in the biomedical sciences find writing articles to be a daunting task. Through her experience of teaching professionals in this field and editing their work, Dr. Diskin has become aware of their unique set of challenges and needs. This book aims to help writers in the field of biomedical sciences address these challenges and meet their needs. This book is a practical writing guide that covers the writing process from the project’s inception to the online distribution of the published article. It includes an in-depth discussion of the expected content of each article section in accordance with the IMRAD format (Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Results and Discussion), as well as many details concerning the preparation of additional submission materials. The characteristics of papers reporting on specific types of research (retrospective, prospective, clinical and non-clinical) are presented, together with article types other than the general full research article, such as case reports and reviews. Importantly, throughout the book, Dr. Diskin discusses and explains the practicalities of writing articles in today’s interconnected environment. Topics such as coordinating the writing in a multinational team, use of different types of software in the writing process and resources available online to support the writer are fleshed out in detail. The book is full of references to external resources for additional reading and learning.”–Back cover
  • Breathtaking: Asthma Care in a Time of Climate Change by Alison Kenner: “Asthma is not a new problem, but today the disease is being reshaped by changing ecologies, healthcare systems, medical sciences, and built environments. A global epidemic, asthma (and our efforts to control it) demands an analysis attentive to its complexity, its contextual nature, and the care practices that emerge from both. At once clearly written and theoretically insightful, ‘Breathtaking’ provides a sweeping ethnographic account of asthma’s many dimensions through the lived experiences of people who suffer from disordered breathing, as well as by considering their support networks, from secondary school teachers and coaches, to breathing educators and new smartphone applications designed for asthma control. Against the backdrop of unbreathable environments, Alison Kenner describes five modes of care that illustrate how asthma is addressed across different sociocultural scales. These modes of care often work in combination, building from or preceding one another. Tensions also exist between them, a point reflected by Kenner’s description of the structural conditions and material rhythms that shape everyday breathing, chronic disease, and our surrounding environments. She argues that new modes of distributed, collective care practices are needed to address asthma as a critical public health issue in the time of climate change.”–Publisher description
  • Infiltrating Healthcare: How Marketing Works Underground to Influence Nurses by Quinn Grundy: “It was once common for pharmaceutical companies and medical device makers to treat doctors to lavish vacations or give them new cars; companies would do virtually anything to buy influence so that their medications or devices would be used in a doctor’s office or hospital. But with growing public scrutiny of kickbacks to doctors, the huge giveaways have disappeared. In ‘Infiltrating Healthcare,’ Quinn Grundy shows that sales representatives are working instead behind the scenes. It is to nurses that these companies now market. Nurses, Grundy argues, are the perfect target for sales reps: their work is largely invisible and frequently undervalued, yet they wield a great deal of influence over treatment and purchasing decisions. Furthermore, there are no legal restrictions on marketing to most nurses. Grundy describes how, under the guise of education or product support, and through gifts and free samples, sales representatives influence nurses in the course of day-to-day clinical practice. Grundy argues that the very presence of sales reps in operating rooms, purchasing committee meetings, and patient care units blurs the boundaries between patient care and medical sales. Helpfully, she also describes ways that nurses can be aware of (and resistant to) their influence. ‘Infiltrating Healthcare’ is a call to action to protect the clinical spaces where we are at our most vulnerable–and the decisions that take place there–from the pursuit of profit at any cost. This is a timely book that shines a light on a practice that often goes unseen and which has tangible implications for healthcare policy and practice.”–Book jacket
  • Code Blue: Inside America’s Medical Industrial Complex by Mike Magee, MD: “Why has the United States, with more resources than any nation, developed a healthcare system that delivers much poorer results, at near double the cost of any other developed country? The answer is a profit prioritized over health care. Mike Magee, M.D., who worked for years inside the medical system administering a hospital and then as a senior executive at the giant pharmaceutical company Pfizer, has spent the last decade deconstructing the often shocking way that the pillars of our health system–Big Pharma, insurance companies, hospitals, the American Medical Association, and anyone affiliated with them–have built a web of connections that Magee refers to as the Medical Industrial Complex. With an eye first and foremost on the bottom line rather than on the nation’s health, each sector has for decades embraced cure over care, aiming to conquer disease rather than concentrate on the cultural and social factors that determine health. This decision Magee calls the ‘original sin’ of our health system. ‘Code Blue’ is a riveting, character-driven narrative that draws back the curtain on the giant industry that consumes one out of every five American dollars such that legendary seer Warren Buffett calls the Medical Industrial Complex ‘the tapeworm of American economic competitiveness.’ Making clear for the first time the mechanisms, greed, and collusion by which our medical system was built over the last eight decades–and arguing persuasively and urgently for the necessity of a single-payer, multi-plan insurance arena of the kind enjoyed by every other major developed nation–Mike Magee gives us invaluable perspective and inspiration by which we can, indeed, reshape the future.”–Book jacket

Communications & Literature students:

  • Linguistics For Non-Linguists: a Primer with Exercises by Frank Parker, Kathryn Riley: “‘Linguistics for Non-Linguists,’ Fifth Edition, makes linguistics accessible to beginners by providing a clear understanding of both the basic and more complex aspects of this challenging subject. This newly revised edition continues to be a readable and user-friendly introductory text that presents the basic elements of linguistics clearly and concisely. Beginning with recognizable topics and gradually moving readers into unfamiliar, technical territory, this text makes the subject matter approachable and understandable for all readers. Including summaries of complex topics, supplemental readings, and hundreds of supplementary and exploratory exercises throughout the text that reinforce the material covered, ‘Linguistics for Non-linguists’ offers students a complete understanding of the basics of this critical field. Specialists in language-related fields including Speech-Language Pathology, Experimental Phonetics, Communication, Education, Psychology, and English as a Second Language will find this text an essential resource and reference.”–Back cover
  • Don’t Read Poetry: a Book About How to Read Poems by Stephanie Burt: “In ‘Don’t Read Poetry,’ award-winning poet and literary critic Stephanie Burt offers an accessible introduction to the seemingly daunting task of reading, understanding, enjoying, and learning from poems. Burt dispels preconceptions about poetry and explains how poems speak to one another–and how they can speak to our lives. She shows readers how to find more poems once they have some poems they care for and how to connect the poetry of the past to the poetry of the present. Burt moves seamlessly from Shakespeare and other classics to the poems of our own day, responsive to current events, or discovered online. She challenges the assumptions that many of us make about ‘poetry,’ whether we think we like it or think we don’t, in order to help us cherish–and distinguish among–individual poems. A masterful guide to a sometimes confounding genre, ‘Don’t Read Poetry’ will instruct and delight newcomers, cognoscenti, and those in between.”–Book jacket

Other interests:

  • Why Superman Doesn’t Take Over the World: What Superheroes Can Tell Us About Economics by J. Brian O’Roark: “Economics and comics may seem to be a world apart. But in the hands of economics professor and comic book hero aficionado Brian O’Roark, the two form a powerful alliance. With brilliant deadpan enthusiasm he shows how the travails of superheroes can explain the building blocks of economics, and how economics explains the mysteries of superhero behavior. Spider-Man’s existential doubts revolve around opportunity costs; Wonder Woman doesn’t have a sidekick because she has a comparative advantage in everything; game theory sheds light on the battle between Captain America and Iron Man; the Joker keeps committing crimes because of the Peltzman effect; and utility curves help us decide who is the greatest superhero of all. ‘Why Superman Doesn’t Take Over the World’ probes the motivations of our favorite heroes, and reveals that the characters in the comics may have powers we don’t, but they are still beholden to the laws of economics.”–Book jacket
  • Small Arms: Children and Terrorism by Mia Bloom with John Horgan: “Why do terrorist organizations use children to support their cause and carry out their activities? ‘Small Arms’ uncovers the brutal truth behind the mobilization of children by terrorist groups. Mia Bloom and John Horgan show us the grim underbelly of society that allows and even encourages the use of children to conduct terrorist activities. They provide readers with the who, what, when, why, and how of this increasingly concerning situation, illuminating a phenomenon that to most of us seems abhorrent. And yet, they argue, for terrorist groups the use of children carries many benefits. Children possess skills that adults lack. They often bring innovation and creativity. Children are, in fact, a superb demographic from which to recruit if you are a terrorist. ‘Small Arms’ answers questions about recruitment strategies and tactics, determines what makes a child terrorist and what makes him or her different from an adult one, and charts the ways in which organizations use them. The unconventional focus on child and youth militants allows the authors to, in essence, give us a biography of the child terrorist and the organizations that use them. We are taken inside the mind of the adult and the child to witness that which perhaps most scares us.”–Book jacket
  • Good Music: What it is and Who Gets to Decide by John J. Sheinbaum: “Over the past two centuries Western culture has largely valorized a particular kind of ‘good’ music–highly serious, wondrously deep, stylistically authentic, heroically created, and strikingly original–and, at the same time, has marginalized music that does not live up to those ideals. In ‘Good Music,’ John J. Sheinbaum explores these traditional models for valuing music. By engaging examples such as Handel oratorios, Beethoven and Mahler symphonies, jazz improvisations, Bruce Springsteen, and prog rock, he argues that metaphors of perfection do justice to neither the perceived strengths nor the assumed weaknesses of the music in question. Instead, he proposes an alternative model of appreciation where abstract notions of virtue need not dictate our understanding. Good music can, with pride, be playful rather than serious, diverse rather than unified, engaging to both body and mind, in dialogue with manifold styles and genres, and collaborative to the core. We can widen the scope of what music we value and reconsider the conventional rituals surrounding it, while retaining the joys of making music, listening closely, and caring passionately.”–Back cover
  • The Fate of Food: What We’ll Eat in a Bigger, Hotter, Smarter World by Amanda Little: “Is the future of food looking bleak–or better than ever? Climate models show that global crop production will decline every decade for the rest of this century due to drought, heat, and flooding. Water supplies are in jeopardy. Meanwhile the world’s population is expected to grow another 30 percent by midcentury. So how, really, will we feed nine billion people sustainably in the coming decades? Amanda Little, a professor at Vanderbilt University and an award-winning journalist, spent three years traveling through a dozen countries and as many U.S. states in search of answers to this question. Her journey took her from old apple orchards in Wisconsin to new remote-controlled farms in Shanghai, from teeming fisheries in Norway to famine-stricken regions of Ethiopia. The race to reinvent the global food system is on, and the challenge is twofold: We must solve the existing problems of industrial agriculture while also preparing for the pressures ahead. Through her interviews and adventures with farmers, scientists, activists, and engineers, Little tells the fascinating story of human innovation and explores new and old approaches to food production while charting the growth of a movement that could redefine sustainable food on a grand scale. She meets small permaculture farmers and ‘Big Food’ executives, botanists studying ancient superfoods and Kenyan farmers growing the country’s first GMO corn. She travels to places that might seem irrelevant to the future of food yet surprisingly play a critical role–a California sewage plant, a U.S. Army research lab, even the inside of a monsoon cloud above Mumbai. Little asks tough questions: Can GMOs actually be good for the environment–and for us? Are we facing the end of animal meat? What will it take to eliminate harmful chemicals from farming? How can a clean, climate-resilient food supply become accessible to all? Throughout her journey Little finds and shares a deeper understanding of the threats of climate change and encounters a sense of awe and optimism about the lessons of our past and the scope of human ingenuity.”–Book jacket

New Library of Congress Website for “Constitution Annotated”

September 17th is Constitution Day, a day commemorating the signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787. In conjunction with this, the Library of Congress has launched a new website “mak[ing] the 3,000 pages of the Constitution Annotated fully searchable and accessible for the first time to online audiences – including Congress, legal scholars, law students and anyone interested in U.S. constitutional law.” (New Website Makes the U.S. Constitution Searchable with Supreme Court Interpretations Throughout History: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-19-090?loclr=ealn)

So what is the Constitution Annotated you ask? “… known officially as the Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation–[it] has served as the official record of the U.S. Constitution. Prepared by attorneys in the American Law Division of the Library’s Congressional Research Service, it explains in layman’s terms the Constitution’s origins, how it was crafted and how every provision in the Constitution has been interpreted throughout history.”

Starting at the Home page, click on “Browse” in the top right-hand corner.
You’re taken to this page where you can browse the Preamble, Articles, & Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.
Then, if you click on “Nineteenth Amendment” for example, you’ll be taken to this page. To see the explanation in “layman’s terms” you would click on the highlighted portion above: “Amdt19.S1.1  Women’s Suffrage”
Which results in this page, the page prepared by attorneys in the American Law Division of the Library’s Congressional Research Service, complete with footnotes at the bottom.

So, check out the new website, Constitution Annotated: Analysis and Interpretation of the U.S. Constitution https://constitution.congress.gov/. Could be easier than carrying the pocket Constitution!

Real ID

If your drivers license or IL state ID expires BEFORE October 2020, you’ll need to decide whether to renew it for a regular drivers license/state ID or get a “Real ID.”

This video explains a little bit about the new Real ID.

Complete this simple interactive checklist to find out exactly what documents you will need to bring to apply for a REAL ID DL/ID before visiting a Driver Services facility.“–Illinois Secretary of State website ( https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/ )

Joy Harjo–First Native American Poet Laureate

Joy Harjo was named the first Native American Poet Laureate to the Library of Congress on June 19th, by Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden.

Our library has three (3) of her books in our collection, two books of poetry and her memoir.

  • How We Became Human: New and Selected Poems by Joy Harjo – “This collection offers a selection of Joy Harjo’s body of work, including poems from She Had Some Horses and Mad Love and War. Known for her signature blend of storytelling, prayer, and song, her work draws from the American tradition of praising the land and the spirit. She began writing in 1973 in the age marked by the takeover at Wounded Knee and the rejuvenation of world indigenous cultures through poetry and music. Recognized today as one of our foremost American poets, Harjo has created a necessary volume that explores how we became human in poems of sustaining grace.”–Back cover.
  • Conflict Resolution For Holy Beings: Poems by Joy Harjo – “A long-awaited poetry collection by one of our most essential Native American voices. In these poems, the joys and struggles of the everyday are played against the grinding politics of being human. Beginning in a hotel room in the dark of a distant city, we travel through history and follow the memory of the Trail of Tears from the bend in the Tallapoosa River to a place near the Arkansas River. Stomp dance songs, blues, and jazz ballads echo throughout. Lost ancestors are recalled. Resilient songs are born, even as they grieve the loss of their country.”–Publisher description.
  • Crazy Brave: a Memoir by Joy Harjo – “In this transcendent memoir, grounded in tribal myth and ancestry, music and poetry, Joy Harjo details her journey to becoming a poet. Born in Oklahoma, the end place of the Trail of Tears, Harjo grew up learning to dodge an abusive stepfather by finding shelter in her imagination, a deep spiritual life, and connection with the natural world. Narrating the complexities of betrayal and love, Crazy Brave is a haunting, visionary memoir about family and breaking apart necessary in finding a voice.”–Back cover.

So what is a “poet laureate?” The Poet Laureate of the United States is a person appointed annually by the Library of Congress and, “during his or her term, the[y] seek to raise the national consciousness to a greater appreciation of the reading and writing of poetry. The Library keeps to a minimum the specific duties required of the Poet Laureate, who opens the literary season in the fall and closes it in the spring. In recent years, Laureates have initiated poetry projects that broaden the audiences for poetry.” (loc.gov)

To learn more about Joy Harjo, visit her Poet Laureate page at the Library of Congress.

Flag Day – June 14, 2019

Celebrate Flag Day by checking out some of our resources! We have:

  • Flags of Our Fathers by James Bradley with Ron Powers: eBook Clint Eastwood film based on book “In February 1945, American Marines plunged into the surf at Iwo Jima–and into history. Through a hail of machine-gun and mortar fire that left the beaches strewn with comrades, they battled to the island’s highest peak. And after climbing through a landscape of hell itself, they raised a flag. Now the son of one of the flagraisers has written a powerful account of six very different young men who came together in a moment that will live forever. To his family, John Bradley never spoke of the photograph or the war. But after his death at age seventy, his family discovered closed boxes of letters and photos. In Flags of Our Fathers, James Bradley draws on those documents to retrace the lives of his father and the men of Easy Company. Following these men’s paths to Iwo Jima, James Bradley has written a classic story of the heroic battle for the Pacific’s most crucial island–an island riddled with Japanese tunnels and 22,000 fanatic defenders who would fight to the last man. But perhaps the most interesting part of the story is what happened after the victory. The men in the photo–three were killed during the battle–were proclaimed heroes and flown home, to become reluctant symbols. For two of them, the adulation was shattering. Only James Bradley’s father truly survived, displaying no copy of the famous photograph in his home, telling his son only: ‘The real heroes of Iwo Jima were the guys who didn’t come back.’ Few books ever have captured the complexity and furor of war and its aftermath as well as Flags of Our Fathers. A penetrating, epic look at a generation at war, this is history told with keen insight, enormous honesty, and the passion of a son paying homage to his father. It is the story of the difference between truth and myth, the meaning of being a hero, and the essence of the human experience of war.”–Publisher description.
  • A Flag Worth Dying For: The Power and Politics of National Symbols by Tim Marshall: “A nation’s flag fluttering in the wind is a sign of power, hope, history, and often war. However, we rarely stop to consider the complex meaning and strong sentiments flags evoke and embody today. From the renewed nationalism of China, to political conflicts in Europe and America, to the terrifying rise of ISIS, the world is a confusing place place right now, and we need to understand the symbols, old and new, that people are rallying around and fighting over. Forthousands of years flags have stood for our identities and ideals. We wave them, burn them, and march under their colors. And still, in the twenty-first century, we die for them. Flags fly at the UN, on the Arab street, from front porches in Texas. They represent the politics of high power as well as the passions of the mob. In ‘A Flag Worth Dying For,’ Tim Marshall–author of the New York Times bestseller ‘Prisoners of Geography: Ten Maps That Explain Everything About the World’, called ‘quite simply, one of the best books about geopoliticies you could imagine’ (London Evening Standard)–returns to the arena of global affairs, combining keen analysis of current events with world history to reveal the power and politics of the symbols that both unite and divide us. In nine chapters covering America, the United Kingdom, Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Latin America, international banners, and flags of terror, Marshall offers insights into the flags of more than eighty-five countries, among them key global superpowers as well as dozens of smaller nations, and shows how their hidden histories figure in the diplomatic relations and political movements of today’s urgent headlines.”–Book jacket

We also have some nice resources for kids in our Juvenile Collection:

  • Exploring our nation. American symbols of freedom – DVD “What’s the story behind some of America’s symbols of liberty? Some of the icons discussed include: the American Flag, the Pledge of Allegiance, the Great Seal of the United States, and the origins of ‘The Star Spangled Banner.’ Students also learn the story of the Statue of Liberty and the importance of Independence Hall in Philadelphia in establishing the country. A new symbol of American freedom is Freedom Tower in New York which was built after the Twin Towers were attacked on September 11, 2001. Part of the series Exploring Our Nation.”–Publisher description
  • Why are there stripes on the American flag? by Martha E. H. Rustad – eBook “Children learn about the American flag, discussing the history of the flag, what the stars, stripes, and colors represent and what the pledge of allegiance means.”–eReadIllinois.
  • We love our flag by Jean Feldman and Holly Karapetkova – eBook “Introduces the American flag and what it stands for through a song sung to the tune of ‘The Farmer in the Dell.'”–eReadIllinois.

June Is Audiobook Appreciation Month

If you have never tried an audiobook format, June is the perfect month. Besides the fact that June is “Audiobook Appreciation Month,” it is also the start of summer vacations. If you are looking for something to listen to while traveling, try out an audiobook. If a hardcover format of a book is on a L-O-N-G library holds list, try out the audiobook version.

During the month of June, we will highlight some audiobook choices that may be of interest to you. This week, it is Hamilton: The Revolution, read by Mariska Hargitay, Lin-Manuel Miranda, & Jeremy McCarter.

This audiobook “gives listeners an unprecedented view of both revolutions, from the only two writers able to provide it. Miranda, along with Jeremy McCarter… traces [the show’s] development from an improbable performance at the White House to its landmark opening night on Broadway six years later.”

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Hamilton closes here in Chicago on January 5th, 2020, so if you have gone to see it, or are going before the close, check out this audiobook about the famous musical play.

New to Collection: The Life of Frederick Douglass Graphic Novel

New to the collection is a graphic novel biography, The Life of Frederick Douglass, written by David F. Walker with art by Damon Smyth. It tells the story of Douglass’s life through beautiful illustrations. He lived during the 19th century, was born into slavery in Maryland, learned to read even though it was forbidden to slaves, and ended up becoming one of America’s greatest writers. He worked to abolish slavery and believed in the equality of all. He also was one of the most photographed Americans of the 19th century, even more so than Abraham Lincoln! “Frederick Douglass was acutely aware of the fact that photographs could be used to help define his image in the public eye and, as a result, also influence how white people viewed blacks. In many pictures, his eyes are cast directly at the camera, an uncommon practice at the time, which resulted in a seemingly defiant expression” (Walker, p. 99). His photos were taken without him smiling because he didn’t want to portray “the racist caricature of a ‘happy slave’” (Wikipedia).

If you are not a fan of the graphic novel medium, a biography is a good way to try it out because the illustrations really bring the person’s story to life, which is helpful when learning about historical subjects. It’s not unlike how “Hamilton the Musical” resonated with people and presented a different way of re-telling history, so, too can a graphic novel achieve the same.

Frederick Douglass in MVCC’s collection: