Moraine Valley Publications on Display

The faculty and staff of Moraine Valley Community College were hard at work last year creating an impressive variety of publications. The Library is proud to congratulate them all and to present this display of their hard work and talent. Click on the image below to see the showcase of books, articles, music, design projects, a podcast series, and more.

2021 Virtual Authors Display

EBSCO Databases Degraded Performance — RESOLVED

The issues have been resolved. All services are now working normally. If you have any questions, please ask a librarian.

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We have received reports of an issue with Latency and Service Unavailable Error with our EBSCOhost Research Databases, Full Text Finder and EBSCO eBooks collections.  Users noticed slow access or no access to these services whether you are on or off-campus. The Moraine Valley library is currently working with EBSCO to resolve these issues. This post will be updated with new information as we get it. If you have any questions, please ask a librarian.

1919 author, Eve L. Ewing, on Charter Schools

If you’ve been following our One Book, One College programming this year, you already know Eve L. Ewing, author of 1919 and other books and articles.  A couple of weeks ago, her opinion piece, Can We Stop Fighting about Charter Schools? was published in The New York Times. As a sociologist and educator, she is often asked about her thoughts on the topic. In this piece she argues that, we need “political leaders to abandon some of the principles that have guided education policy in our generation.” She says “we need to replace the fight over charter schools with the assertion that every child deserves a great school,” and to do that, we need to take “seriously the ‘educators don’t get paid enough’ realizations of 2020” and address “the teacher shortage that is going to worsen in the aftermath of the pandemic,” (Ewing, 2021).

If the topic of charter schools interest you, the library can help. You can find books on charter schools in our library catalog.  If you are looking for articles, our education databases are a good place to start. You can also find articles on the topic in our news databases and many of our multiple subject databases. When in doubt, be sure to Ask a Librarian!

Ewing, E. L. (2021, Feb 22). Can we stop fighting about charter schools? New York Times (Online) Retrieved from https://go.openathens.net/redirector/morainevalley.edu?url=https://www.proquest.com/newspapers/can-we-stop-fighting-about-charter-schools/docview/2493195195/se-2?accountid=1977

Pandemic Poster Art

“A poster is a temporary promotion of an idea, product, or event put up in a public space for mass consumption. Typically, posters include both textual and graphic elements, although a poster may be either wholly graphical or wholly text.” With our current technology, posters are not a necessary tool to help spread information but perhaps because of the overload of information that comes across our computer screens, a simple visual sign just might be an effective attention-getter. Covid 19 posters are found in public building like libraries, hospitals, and schools. By comparison, the 1918 Pandemic posters were pasted on buildings, bars, theaters, and train stations.

Regardless of 2021 technology, “the work of artists has been a central platform of how society responds to times of great social change.” Check out some interesting links on the use of poster art during pandemic crises.

Pandemic Posters Through the Years

The posters created by Wisconsin artists during the COVID-19 pandemic will become part of the collections at the Society where they can be used by future generations.

Canadian Poster Art

Poster Art from Underserved Communities (Click on PDF version)

Blame it on the media: The erosion of trust and truth, and what we can do about it (Video)

We love to blame “the media” for all of society’s ills. It’s true that trends in the news media have contributed to where we are today: divided, uncivil, unable to agree on the most basic facts. But trust in the media was declining long before claims of “fake news” and labeling the press as “the enemy of the people.” So how can we recognize truth and identify lies? How can we improve our own “fake news” filters? How can we work toward solutions to the erosion of trust and truth—the very foundation of our democracy? Please join Communications and Journalism professor Lisa Couch and Information Literacy Librarian Tish Hayes in this timely and important discussion. This event is organized by the MVCC Democracy Commitment.

What does “vaccine efficacy” mean?

With the third Covid-19 vaccine approved by the FDA, there has been a great of talk comparing “vaccine efficacy” rates. You may be trying to figure out what all of this means? What is “vaccine efficacy” and can we use it to compare the different vaccines? Well, this NY Times article “What Do Vaccine Efficacy Numbers Actually Mean?”really helps. Ihttps://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/03/03/science/vaccine-efficacy-coronavirus.html?smid=url-sharet offers some clear explanations.

Revisiting the Past & Looking to the Future: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion 1919-2021-Dr. Tracy Crump (video)

Special guest Dr. Tracy Crump, Associate Professor of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice at St. Xavier University. Dr. Crump’s talk will consider how to build inclusive spaces in our society by exploring the root causes of social unrest in Chicago over the last century. She will start with the Red Summer of 1919 and move forward.

Tracy Crump holds the Ph.D. in Criminology, Law and Justice from the University of Illinois at Chicago, a juris doctorate from from the John Marshall Law School, and earned the LL.M. (post-JD studies) at Loyola University Chicago School of Law.

Never Before Seen Van Gogh Painting Set To Go To Auction

Street scene in Montmarte,” an 1887 painting by Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh, has been privately owned by a French family and rarely seen by anyone in public. It is set to be publicly displayed for the first time in Amsterdam and Hong Kong before being auctioned off by Sotheby’s. It is estimated that it will sell for almost $10 million. I think I’ll have to stick to checking out these books in our collection for now.

View 1 of Scène de rue à Montmartre (Impasse des Deux Frères et le Moulin à Poivre)     .
Photo from Sotheby’s

“Float Like a Butterfly, Sting Like a Bee” on This Day in History

On this day, February 25, 1964, a young 22-year-old Muhammad Ali, then still known by his birth name of Cassius Clay, defeated Sonny Liston to become the Heavyweight Champion. One of his best, and arguably most famous, phrases , “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee. The hands can’t hit what the eyes can’t see” was uttered about this fight, a fight in which Ali was was not favored to win. But win he did, and from it we got another unforgettable Ali quote, “I am the greatest!”

Interested in learning more about the Muhammad Ali? Check out some of the library’s resources about him here.

Enjoy this photo from the TIME 100 Photos Collection

Muhammad Ali vs. Sonny Liston | 100 Photographs | The Most Influential  Images of All Time

The “Divine Nine”: the History & Discussion of Black Greek Letter Organizations (video)

The Divine Nine is made up of nine historically Black fraternities and sororities, formally known as the National Pan-Hellenic Council.
Greek Organization members Misty Williams and Philip Davis sat down with Moraine Valley students via WebEx and PowerPoint to provide background about their respective organizations and the other Divine Nine organizations. Ms. Williams is Moraine’s director of the Upward Bound project, and Ms. Davis is educational case manager for TRIO/Student Support Services.
The Divine Nine include: Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi, Delta Sigma Theta, Phi Beta Sigma, Zeta Phi Beta, Sigma Gamma Rho, and Iota Phi Theta.

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